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This 1939 pin set belongs to Marjorie Kockmann of Fargo. The Scotty dog on the left is named Mokie.

Neighbors: Know anything about Mokie the Scotty dog?

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variety Fargo,ND 58102 http://www.inforum.com/sites/default/files/styles/square_300/public/field/image/mokie.JPG?itok=DXTjlECs
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Neighbors: Know anything about Mokie the Scotty dog?
Fargo ND 101 5th Street North 58102

What do you know about Mokie?

That’s the name of this pin’s Scotty dog on the left.

A friend of Marjorie Klockmann, Fargo, gave her the pin.

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Marjorie says her friend got this pin in 1939 by sending in her name to the national radio show “Don McNeil’s Breakfast Club.”

That show has been mentioned several time in this column. But Mokie is something new, and Marjorie wonders if any of you has a Mokie pin or at least remembers when McNeil gave them away.

Getting to school

Now, a story from Terrance “Terry” Henriksen about his dad when he was growing up on a farm in Towner County, N.D.

Terry, now of Sun City West, Ariz., says his dad, Duane Henriksen, got a horse to ride to school when he was in first grade. But Duane was afraid of the horse at first, so he walked to school that first year. Terry thinks it was a two-mile hike.

“Dad said he was less afraid of the horse the second year and didn’t care to walk to school, so he then rode the horse,” Terry writes.

Years later, when Duane married and Terry came along, transportation to the country school was in the horse-drawn wagon nicknamed the “hack,” about which many people have written Neighbors.

“I recall how luxurious that bus (wagon) seemed to me as a little boy,” Terry says. “Before dad got it, he took me to school either on the ‘stone boat’, which we actually used to clean the barn, or later in a flare-side wagon box on runners. Both were open to the cold.

“The stone boat, which was probably about 5-by-6 feet, was little more than planks on two 4-by-6 steel-shod runners. Dad had the reins to hang on to and sometimes a pitchfork with the tines jammed into the floor and the handle under his arm. All I had to hang onto was his leg, and it seemed like a wild ride.

“Anyhow, the nice heated bus with a bench to sit on (in the hack) seemed so secure and warm. I loved it.”

If you have an item of interest for this column, mail it to Neighbors, The Forum, Box 2020, Fargo, ND 58107; fax it to (701) 241-5487; or email blind@forumcomm.com

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