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Celebrate spring with these May Day crafts

Hanging a May Day basket on a friend or neighbor's door is an old tradition. "Seeds and Stitches" blog / Special to The Forum1 / 5
May Day cones can be filled with candy, trinkets or flowers. "Seeds and Stitches" blog / Special to The Forum2 / 5
At Heirlooms Thrift & Gift's DIY Spring Planting Workshop, people can pot plants and purchase unique vessels for their greenery. Anna G. Larson / The Forum3 / 5
May Day ribbon wands are a nod to the Maypole. "Little Girl Designs" blog / Special to The Forum4 / 5
Succulents and other green plants welcome spring at Heirloom's planting workshop. Anna G. Larson / The Forum5 / 5

FARGO—I remember bending pipe cleaners to create handles that I'd attach to Dixie cups filled with candy.

My sister and I would run up to our neighbors' porches, ring the doorbell and leave the May Day baskets. We'd look forward to the ritual each spring and our entire north Fargo neighborhood would participate.

May Day celebrates the return of spring.

Historically, festivities included the gathering of wildflowers and green branches, weaving floral garlands and dancing around a Maypole, according to various online sources.

To honor May Day, Heirlooms Thrift & Gift in Fargo will host a DIY Spring Planting Workshop on Sunday, May 1. Attendees will purchase a vessel from the shop, like an antique tea cup, and their choice of flowering plant or succulents. Then, they can pot their plant at the store. The proceeds benefit Hospice of the Red River Valley.

At Heirlooms Thrift & Gift's DIY Spring Planting Workshop, people can pot plants and purchase unique vessels for their greenery.

"People are happy being around plants," says Heirlooms Manager Laura Lesoine. "We like this idea of customizing and old becoming new."

The store, which is typically closed on Sundays, will be open for shopping, too.

Besides planting something green, here are two more crafty ways to celebrate spring on May Day.

Paper Cone May Day Basket

Hanging a basket on a friend or neighbor's door is a May Day tradition.

Supplies

Printed paper, at least 8-by-11 inches (The size of the paper dictates the size of the cone basket)

Hole punch

Tape (regular or decorative)

Twine

Optional: Stamp or marker

Directions

1. Fold one corner of the paper into the middle of the sheet to create a cone. Tape the seam.

2. Trim the top of the cone to round it.

3. Optional: Stamp or write message on the front or the inside of the cone.

4. Using the hole punch, punch two holes near the front of the cone and thread twine through them, tying them inside the cone. (If you punch the holes at the back of the cone, it won't hang properly.)

5. Fill the cone with candy, small trinkets or flowers. If filling it with flowers, wrap the flower stems in a damp paper towel and then put the wrapped stems in plastic sandwich bag secured with a rubber band to keep the paper dry.

Adapted from www.SeedsandStitches.com

May Day Ribbon Wands

Ribbon wands pay tribute to the Maypole.

Supplies

Ribbon of various widths and colors

Scissors

Wooden dowels in your choice of length

Sandpaper

Screw eyes for each dowel

A glass of water

Optional: Paint and permanent markers

Directions

1. If the dowel is rough, carefully sand it to make it smooth.

2. Optional: Paint the dowel or draw designs on it with markers.

3. Dip the end of the dowel in water to soften the wood and wait a couple of minutes. Twist in the screw eye.

4. Cut lengths of ribbon for the wand and thread through the screw eye. Tie the ribbons in a knot. The length of the ribbon is a personal preference, as are the colors used. Adapted from www.LittleGirlDesigns.com

If you go:

What: DIY Spring Planting Workshop

When: noon to 4 p.m. Sunday, May 1

Where: Heirlooms, 3120 25th St. S., Fargo

Info: Succulents, ivy and flowering plants will be available for purchase, along with containers like tea cups. Attendees pay the cost of the plant and vessel, which starts at about $5. Heirlooms, along with Love Always Floral in Fargo, will supply the rest of the materials. Proceeds benefit Hospice of the Red River Valley.

Anna G. Larson

Anna G. Larson is a features reporter with The Forum who writes a weekly column featuring stylish people in Fargo-Moorhead. Larson graduated from North Dakota State University with a degree in journalism and joined The Forum in July 2012. She's a Fargo native who enjoys travel, food, baking, fashion, animals, coffee and all things Midwestern. Follow her on Instagram and Twitter: @msannagrace 

(701) 241-5525
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