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Published June 15, 2011, 12:00 AM

Halgrimson: Make your own teriyaki

When I think of teriyaki, I remember the teriyaki steaks that were on the menu at the Cork ’n Cleaver restaurant in south Fargo. But, alas, they are no longer served at the Cork.

By: Andrea Hunter Halgrimson, INFORUM

When I think of teriyaki, I remember the teriyaki steaks that were on the menu at the Cork ’n Cleaver restaurant in south Fargo. But, alas, they are no longer served at the Cork.

So I’ve had to make do with commercial teriyaki sauce, which is available in most supermarkets. But sometimes I make my own sauce.

Teriyaki is a Japanese dish in which beef, pork or chicken is marinated in a mixture of rice wine (sake), sugar, ginger and other seasonings. Making the marinade at home offers scope for the imagination.

A marinade is a liquid used to flavor the meat and vegetables in which it is marinated, or soaked. The acid usually present in marinades tenderizes meats, so it is good for tougher cuts of beef.

Glass or stainless-steel dishes – never aluminum – should be used to contain the items to be marinated. I always put the ingredients in a plastic bag, seal it and place it in a dish. This method allows the ingredients to be turned easily while waiting in the fridge for two to three days until they are cooked.

The bag should be removed from the fridge and the meat allowed to come to room temperature before grilling or broiling. If the meat is cold, it will tighten up over heat and become tough.

Never save marinade to reuse if it has had meat or chicken soaking in it. Teriyaki marinade keeps in the fridge for two to three weeks.

Molasses may be used for part of the sugar in the following recipe. If you are marinating chicken or pork, a dollop of orange marmalade may be included in the recipe. And sherry or whisky may be used instead of the sake.

Teriyaki Marinade

1 cup soy sauce

3 tablespoons sake

½ cup brown sugar

¼ cup Worcestershire sauce

3 tablespoons distilled white vinegar

3 tablespoons vegetable oil

2 to 3 cloves garlic, peeled, root removed and mashed

1 tablespoon grated fresh ginger root

In a medium bowl, mix the ingredients together and stir until sugar dissolves. Makes about 3 cups.


Source: “The Food Lover’s Companion” by Sharon Tyler Herbst

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