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Published July 03, 2012, 11:30 PM

Hot Topics: Fourth of July declared deadliest day for teens, Americans on highways

ENGLEWOOD, Colo. – Summer is supposed to be a time of celebration for teens and their families with prom, graduation and college on the horizon. Unfortunately, new analysis of crash data from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety shows that July 4 is the deadliest day for teens on the road and is just as deadly for the motorists that will be driving alongside them.

By: Source: Allstate, INFORUM

ENGLEWOOD, Colo. – Summer is supposed to be a time of celebration for teens and their families with prom, graduation and college on the horizon. Unfortunately, new analysis of crash data from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety shows that July 4 is the deadliest day for teens on the road and is just as deadly for the motorists that will be driving alongside them.

In the U.S., car crashes are the number one cause of death for everyone ages 1-34, with teens crashing four times more often than any other age group. Based on the latest available data, IIHS reports that more than 800 people were killed on July 4 from 2006-2010, making July one of the deadliest months on the road for drivers. And if the projections remain true this year, an average of 140 people will lose their lives on July 4 due to car crashes. In 2010, North Dakota lost 12 due to fatal car crashes during the month of July.

Teens accounted for nearly 10 percent of the fatalities that occur on July 4 and are particularly susceptible to fatal distracted driving incidents. Research from The Allstate Foundation found that 49 percent of teens report that texting is their biggest distraction behind the wheel.

“These tragedies are compounded by the fact that many crashes are preventable,” stated Pat Stocking, a Fargo-based agent. “Driver error, speeding and distractions are the main causes of crashes, and seemingly simple activities such as switching radio stations or interacting with friends can significantly impair a teen’s or adult’s ability to react quickly to changing traffic conditions. Staying focused on the road, wearing seat belts and following the speed limit and other road rules are simple steps we can all take this July 4 to make sure that we return home safely.”

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