WDAY.com |

North Dakota's #1 news website 10,650,498 page views — March 2014

Published July 27, 2012, 11:30 PM

Popularity of farmers markets growing

Society demanding healthier food options, vice chairwoman of Dilworth Park Board says
DILWORTH – Bill Johnson has been farming his entire life. For the past eight years, the Hawley man has been involved with farmers markets, most recently at the new Whistle Stop Park Farmers Market in Dilworth that started last August.

By: Jessica Ballou, INFORUM

DILWORTH – Bill Johnson has been farming his entire life.

For the past eight years, the Hawley man has been involved with farmers markets, most recently at the new Whistle Stop Park Farmers Market in Dilworth that started last August.

Johnson said it’s a good market with a lot of community support.

“A lot of communities say they want a farmers market, but they don’t want to support it,” he said.

“It’s the kind of farmers market that will grow,” he added of the one in Dilworth.

The popularity of farmers markets is growing through the Fargo-Moorhead area. Cheryl Stetz, vice chairwoman of the Dilworth Park Board, isn’t surprised.

“I truly feel as a society we are demanding healthier food options,” she said.

Deb Hoesley agrees.

Hoesley sells vegetables with her family at the West Fargo Farmer’s Market and at Festival Market at Dike East.

“If you know where the food is coming from, know the person who grows your food, you can trust it,” she said.

Vendors at local farmers markets haven’t limited themselves to just selling food.

Brittany Sinclair, of Fargo, sells soaps, lotion bars and lip balms for her company The Honey B at the Dilworth farmers market and the VA farmers market in Fargo.

She started making natural products when she was pregnant with her third child and wanted to de-chemical their home.

“If I wouldn’t put it on my baby, I wouldn’t sell it,” she said.

People interested in starting a farmers market in Fargo need to contact the city of Fargo if they want to use public property such as a street or sidewalk, or the park district if they want to use park land.

Park districts hold most of the power when it comes to creating farmers markets as well in West Fargo, Moorhead and Dilworth.

Tara Ekren, special events coordinator with the Moorhead Park District, said to get involved with an already established farmers market, just show up and talk to the vendors.

Guide to local farmers markets

Fargo:

• Downtown Farmer’s Market, U.S. Bank Plaza:

8 a.m. to noon Saturdays through September; crafts, bakery goods, honey, jams, jellies and produce.

• Great Plains Producer Association’s Community Farmers Market, Dike East Park: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. or until produce is gone Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays through October; flowers, jams, jellies, pickles, salsas and produce.

• Festival Market, Dike East Park: 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays; produce, jams, jellies, herbs and snacks.

• Stonewest Village Farmers Market, 4955 17th Ave. S.: 3 to 7 p.m. Tuesdays; produce and goods.

• VA Farmers Market, 2102 Elm Street: 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Fridays through October; produce, handmade products and other goods.

Moorhead:

• Gardener’s Flea Market, Davy Park (First Avenue and Eighth Street North): 5 to 8:30 p.m. Aug. 12 and Sept. 9; jams, jellies and produce.

• My Sister’s Farm, Moorhead Center Mall: 6:30 to 8 p.m. Aug. 21; breads, baked goods, honey, snacks, poultry, meats and produce, all organic.

• Sydney’s Health Market, 810 30th Ave. S.: 3 to 7 p.m. Tuesdays or Fridays through October; locally grown organic produce.

West Fargo:

• Farmers Market and Beyond, South Elmwood Park: 4 to 7 p.m. Thursdays through September; berries, herbs, flowers, hand-crafted items, agricultural products and fresh produce.

• FM Farmers Market, 349 Main Avenue: 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. weekdays, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturdays and noon to 6 p.m. Sundays through December.

Dilworth:

• Whistle Stop Farmers Market, Whistle Stop Park: 3 to 7 p.m. Thursdays through October; produce, flowers, homemade goods, jams and jellies.


Have a comment to share about a story? Letters to the editor should include author’s name, address and phone number. Generally, letters should be no longer than 250 words. All letters are subject to editing. Send a letter to the editor.


Readers can reach Forum reporter Jessica Ballou at (701) 235-7311

Tags: