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Published October 24, 2012, 11:30 PM

Hot Topics: Beans show promise with diabetes

Eating a cup of beans or lentils every day may help people with type 2 diabetes control their blood sugar and possibly reduce their risk of heart attacks and stroke, according to a Canadian study.

By: Source: Reuters, INFORUM

Eating a cup of beans or lentils every day may help people with type 2 diabetes control their blood sugar and possibly reduce their risk of heart attacks and stroke, according to a Canadian study.

Researchers, whose results appeared in the Archives of Internal Medicine, found that compared with a diet rich in whole grains, getting a daily dose of legumes led to small drops in an important measure of blood sugar as well as in blood pressure and cholesterol levels.

After three months on the bean diet, study participants’ estimated 10-year risk of cardiovascular disease had fallen from 10.7 percent to 9.6 percent, according to the group.

“Legumes are good protein sources, and proteins tend to dampen the blood glucose response and they lower blood pressure,” said David Jenkins of St. Michael’s Hospital in Toronto, who led the study.

“They are also good sources of fiber and that tends to be associated with lower cholesterol.”

Legumes such as beans, chickpeas and lentils are already recommended for diabetics due to their low glycemic index, a measure of how far and how fast a given food sends up blood sugar. But there are few studies of their direct effects on diabetes, according to Jenkins.

Jenkins and his team divided 121 people with diabetes into two groups, one of which was instructed to up their intake of cooked legumes by at least a cup a day. The other was told to eat more whole wheat products to boost their fiber intake.

After three months, the researchers found that hemoglobin A1c levels had dropped from 7.4 percent to 6.9 percent in people eating beans, while it had fallen from 7.2 percent to 6.9 percent tin those getting extra whole wheat.

The number reflects the average blood sugar levels over the previous two to three months. Experts recommend keeping it under 7 percent.

Jenkins said that even though the drops were not huge, they were impressive partly because the whole-grain comparison diet is a healthy one and in part because people in the study were already on diabetes and blood pressure drugs.

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