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Published December 11, 2012, 11:35 PM

Halgrimson: Enjoy tasty rømmegrøt in pie form

This time of year, the food police are giving advice on how to eat correctly so you can live to be 190 and not gain weight while doing it. The holidays are one of their favorite times. They often seem to be skulking around in the fridge and kitchen cupboards and under restaurant tables.

By: Andrea Hunter Halgrimson, INFORUM

This time of year, the food police are giving advice on how to eat correctly so you can live to be 190 and not gain weight while doing it.

The holidays are one of their favorite times. They often seem to be skulking around in the fridge and kitchen cupboards and under restaurant tables. They dance on the buffet tables at parties and poke restlessly into cartons of heavy cream, trays of eggs and the sugar canister.

My method of watching my diet is to put the food on a plate and just eat half of it. I taste everything that comes my way, especially lutefisk and lefse with lots of butter. I sample cakes and cookies. I am especially fond of fruitcake, berlinakranse, krumkaker, sandbakkel and spritz. And when a bowl of rømmegrøt is on the menu, I never pass it up. So there.

Recently I had the pleasure of tasting something I had never had before or even heard of. The Fargo Sons of Norway serves homemade pie with their lunches on Thursdays, and on the table with the other desserts was a Rømmegrøt Pie. “Rømmegrøt pie?” I asked.

I talked to club manager Patty Hagen who had formulated the recipe, and she was kind enough to pass it on to me. Generally, my favorite desserts are brown ones with lots of dark chocolate. But I am now a convert to at least one white dessert. Uffda, but that rømmegrøt pie is delicious.

Rømmegrøt is a Norwegian cream pudding and is often served during the holidays. Sometimes, it is made with sour cream, but there are many, many recipes for this wonderful dish, one of which I’ve included.

Patty’s pie differs from rømmegrøt pudding in that it uses corn starch as a thickener and light cream rather than flour and heavy cream, making it a perfect dish for the food police.

Patty says that she uses a chef’s torch to brown the sugar on top of the pie. It’s the same tool that is used to brown the tops of crème brule. They are available at cookware shops and online.

Rømmegrøt Pie

1 9-inch pie crust, baked

2¼ cups light cream

4 tablespoons cornstarch

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

¾ cup white sugar

4 tablespoons melted butter

2 tablespoons melted butter

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon mixed with 2 teaspoons white sugar

Mix cornstarch and sugar. Add 4 tablespoons butter and light cream. Cook in a non-reactive pan over medium heat, stirring constantly, until mixture boils and gets thick and creamy. Remove from heat and add vanilla.

Turn on broiler.

Pour mixture into pie crust. Drizzle with 2 tablespoons melted butter and dust with cinnamon-sugar mixture. Put under broiler until it bubbles. Watch carefully because it will burn quickly. Refrigerate until set, at least 2 hours.

Rømmegrøt

4 cups milk

1 cup heavy cream

1 cup butter

¾ cup flour

½ cup sugar

¼ cup butter

Sugar and cinnamon

Heat milk and cream. Do NOT scorch. Set aside.

In large, heavy pan, melt 1 cup butter and add flour, cook about five minutes, stirring constantly.

Slowly pour in milk mixture and cook, stirring often, until mixture bubbles and thickens. Add sugar and stir to combine. Pour ¼ cup melted butter on top. Sprinkle with sugar and cinnamon. Serve warm. Makes ½ gallon.

Note: This may be kept warm and served from a crock pot. Use low heat. Add butter, sugar and cinnamon after mixture is put in crock pot. Rømmegrøt is traditionally served at Christmas.

Readers can reach Forum food columnist Andrea Hunter Halgrimson

at ahalgrimson@forumcomm.com. This article is written exclusively for The Forum.

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