WDAY.com |

North Dakota's #1 news website 10,650,498 page views — March 2014

Published January 17, 2013, 11:36 PM

Holt: Sickness, winter blahs stall progress

On Dec. 1, I had the whole month to look forward to holiday-season fun (potlucks! ugly sweater parties! toasts in tiaras!). The snow seemed to sparkle with the promise of one year ending and a new one beginning. Then the calendar turned to January. Oh, January.

By: Meredith Holt, INFORUM

On Dec. 1, I had the whole month to look forward to holiday-season fun (potlucks! ugly sweater parties! toasts in tiaras!).

The snow seemed to sparkle with the promise of one year ending and a new one beginning.

Then the calendar turned to January.

Oh, January.

Mine started with mimosas, Dayquil and Kleenex.

Sadly, I’ve spent the first few weeks of 2013 like many others in Fargo-Moorhead – battling various forms of the dreaded “crud.”

Day one my throat hurt so bad I could barely swallow.

Day 13 it felt like an alien life form was attacking my spine every time I coughed or laughed. I’d rather my back ache from a good workout.

Just when I think I’m getting better, a new crop of symptoms show up.

Needless to say, January thus far has been about surviving, which means I’ve made little to no weight-loss progress.

You’d think I’d lose at least a pound or two on the ginger ale-chicken noodle soup-saltines diet, but nope. Not an ounce.

Feeling constantly nauseated has made it easier for me to say “no thanks” to my three favorite food groups, sugar, fat and salt.

Maybe practicing saying “no,” even if it’s because I’m sick, will make saying “no” easier when I’m healthy.

Whatever flu virus I was lucky enough to contract after I started getting over my cold has given me a better understanding of what life is like for people with dietary restrictions.

Basically, “I want to eat yummy things, but my tummy doesn’t want me to eat yummy things!”

I’d gotten so used to eating whatever I want, whenever I want (which is dangerous for me!), I’d forgotten what it’s like not to be able to do that.

I have a newfound respect for friends with Celiac disease, food allergies or digestive problems who have to carefully monitor what they eat or suffer the consequences.

If I were in their shoes, I might not have such a problem with emotional eating and overeating because I’d be forced to form an entirely different relationship with food.

On the worst night of my January sickness, I came home from work, curled into a ball and lay there feeling miserable until it was time to return to work.

I felt bad paying little attention to my boyfriend, but I couldn’t help it, and he had “Jewels Maze” to keep him company, anyway.

Flu season had rendered me useless. What a waste.

The shorter days and colder weather don’t help, either.

It’s hard to get motivated to make any sort of positive change in your life when all you want to do is curl up on the couch with your boyfriend, a couple of cats, a blanket and Hulu.

And if Facebook and Twitter provide any indication, I’m not alone. I think we all want to hibernate until spring, or at least till St. Patty’s Day.

It could be the winter blahs; it could be seasonal affective disorder; it could be part of living Up North. Whatever it is, I want to live in my Hello Kitty pajama pants and drink nothing but hot cocoa.

Nice, yes, but unproductive.

So my lifelong pursuit of health and fitness has yet again stalled while I focus on the basic “health” part.

Feeling like you’re going to hurl into your wastebasket is not conducive to change.

But despite my seemingly never-ending sickness, I have made it to two personal training sessions a week followed by a little cardio.

That’s something, right? Here’s hoping February will be better.


Forum reporter Meredith Holt has lost 105 pounds since May 2010. She will share stories of her weight-loss journey in her column, which runs the first and third Friday of each month in SheSays. Readers can reach her at (701) 241-5590.

Tags: