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Published February 28, 2013, 11:34 PM

5 Things Friday: 5 things that make you tired

FARGO – There’s “the afternoon slump,” and then there’s can’t-stop-yawning tiredness. Aside from lack of sleep or inadequate sleep, nutrient deficiencies, diet and exercise habits and your mental health can affect energy level.

By: Meredith Holt, INFORUM

Editor’s note: “5 Things Friday” is a weekly feature in SheSays that runs on – you guessed it – Fridays. It focuses on quick tips, ideas, activities and more – all in bunches of five. If you have a “5 Things Friday” suggestion, contact us at shesays@forumcomm.com.

FARGO – There’s “the afternoon slump,” and then there’s can’t-stop-yawning tiredness.

Aside from lack of sleep or inadequate sleep, nutrient deficiencies, diet and exercise habits and your mental health can affect energy level.

Here are 5 things that make you tired:

  1. Skipping breakfast. Without breakfast, your metabolism and other functions slow.

    Start your day by getting something in your system, preferably including protein and complex carbs.

  2. Dehydration. If you feel thirsty, you’re already suffering from mild dehydration, which can make you feel sluggish.

    Keep a water bottle nearby, and find other ways of increasing your water intake, like sipping tea or eating more fruits and vegetables.

  3. Low iron. Iron is needed to produce hemoglobin, which transports oxygen throughout your body. When it’s low, your body has to work harder.

    Lean ground beef, shellfish, beans, spinach, broccoli and dried fruits are good sources of iron.

  4. Over-exercising. Exercise helps decrease the stress hormone cortisol, but overdoing it can actually increase it.

    Rest and recovery are just as important as sweating it out, so give yourself a break, especially after a particularly strenuous workout.

  5. Depression. Fatigue is one of the most common physical symptoms of depression.

    Research has shown that those who are depressed are four times more likely to develop unexplained fatigue.


Readers can reach Forum reporter Meredith Holt at (701) 241-5590

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