WDAY.com |

North Dakota's #1 news website 10,650,498 page views — March 2014

Published March 06, 2013, 10:40 PM

Bismarck among small airports irked by removal of body scanners

BISMARCK – Managers at dozens of small airports have expressed outrage at federal officials for hauling new full-body scanners away from their facilities and sending them to large hubs that haven’t yet upgraded older machines criticized for showing too much anatomy.

By: James Macpherson, Associated Press, INFORUM

BISMARCK – Managers at dozens of small airports have expressed outrage at federal officials for hauling new full-body scanners away from their facilities and sending them to large hubs that haven’t yet upgraded older machines criticized for showing too much anatomy.

U.S. Transportation Security Administration contractors were threatened with arrest after officials at a Montana airport said they received no notice before the workers arrived. In North Dakota, the scanners are set to be yanked from a terminal remodeled last year with $40,000 in local funds just to fit the new machines.

“We think it’s silly to have installed the thing and then come back nine months later and take it out,” Bismarck airport manager Greg Haug said.

The L3 Millimeter Wave body scanners, which are about the size of a minivan on end and produce cartoonlike outlines of travelers, are being removed from 49 smaller airports across the country to help replace 174 full-body scanners used at larger airports. After controversy erupted over the bare images of a person’s body the full-body scanners produce, Congress set a June deadline for them to be removed or updated.

But officials at smaller airports said removing their machines will produce longer lines, increased pat-downs, decreased security and a waste of taxpayer money.

North Dakota officials are especially critical of the swap because the state’s airline boardings are skyrocketing with booming oil development. TSA is slated to remove the newly installed scanners this week at airports in Bismarck, Grand Forks and Minot.

“It does seem like a waste of time and energy, but the biggest issue is security concerns,” state Aeronautics Commissioner Larry Taborsky said of removing the machines. “We are feeding a lot of traffic into the national system.”

“Smaller airports are being treated as less important as bigger airports in the system,” said Dave Ruppel, manager of the Yampa Valley Regional Airport in Steamboat Springs, Colo. “Any airport you go through is an entrance into the whole system.”

Ruppel’s airport lost its scanner late last month. He said the move to replace machines at big airports with scanners from smaller airports is “a political solution to a security problem.”

TSA said in a statement that it will cost about

$2.5 million to remove the machines from the 49 smaller airports and reinstall them at bigger facilities. The agency would not identify the specific airports where the scanners are slated to be removed. Airport directors said the machines cost about $150,000 each.


Copyright © 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. The information contained in the AP News report may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without the prior written authority of The Associated Press.


Have a comment to share about a story? Letters to the editor should include author’s name, address and phone number. Generally, letters should be no longer than 250 words. All letters are subject to editing. Send a letter to the editor.

Tags: