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Published April 12, 2013, 11:30 PM

Hot Topics: Exercise as good as massage for sore muscles, study finds

The aches and pains people suffer after working out more than usual can be relieved just as well by exercise as by massage, according to a new study.

By: Reuters, INFORUM

The aches and pains people suffer after working out more than usual can be relieved just as well by exercise as by massage, according to a new study.

“It’s a common belief that massage is better, but it isn’t better. Massage and exercise had the same benefits,” said Lars Andersen, the lead author of the study and a professor at the National Research Center for the Working Environment in Copenhagen.

Earlier research has shown that massage can offer some relief from workout soreness.

To see how well light exercise compares, Andersen and his colleagues asked 20 women to do a shoulder exercise while hooked up to a resistance machine.

The women shrugged their shoulders while the machine applied resistance, which engaged the trapezius muscle between the neck and shoulders.

Two days later, the women came back to the lab with aching trapezius muscles. On average they rated their achiness as a five on a 10-point scale, up from 0.8 before they had done the shoulder workout.

Then the women received a 10-minute massage on one shoulder and did a 10-minute exercise on the other shoulder. Some women got the massage first, while others did the exercise first.

The exercise again involved shoulder shrugs; this time the women gripped an elastic tube held down by their foot to give some resistance. (Hygenic Corp., which makes the tubing used in the study, supported the study.)

Andersen’s group found that, compared to the shoulder that wasn’t getting any attention, massage and exercise each helped diminish muscle soreness.

The effect peaked 10 minutes after each treatment, with women reporting a reduction in their pain of 0.8 points after the warm-up exercise and 0.7 points after the massage.

“It’s a moderate change,” said Andersen, whose study appeared in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research.

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