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Published May 21, 2013, 11:58 PM

Son’s quick-thinking CPR on dad recognized by Moorhead police

MOORHEAD – Nick Enger was sleeping on his parents’ couch in Moorhead when he woke up to what he thought sounded like wheezing. He ran to his parents’ bedroom, where his mom was trying to perform CPR on his dad. Nick ran back downstairs.

By: Charly Haley, INFORUM

MOORHEAD – Nick Enger was sleeping on his parents’ couch in Moorhead when he woke up to what he thought sounded like wheezing.

He ran to his parents’ bedroom, where his mom was trying to perform CPR on his dad. Nick ran back downstairs.

“I had to find my phone and then I had to turn it on,” he said.

The moment crawled by, seeming like forever before he was able to call 911. Then he went back upstairs as he told the dispatcher he thought his father had a heart attack.

Although his mother was still performing CPR, it seemed like his dad had died.

“I threw the phone to my mom, grabbed my dad off the bed and onto the floor and started doing CPR,” the 22-year-old son said.

When officers and first responders arrived, they performed an AED shock to Lin Enger’s heart, reviving him enough to be transported to the hospital.

That was on the morning of Nov. 24, 2012. Lin was in the hospital for about four days and was discharged with a defibrillator in his heart that’s still there today.

The Moorhead Police Department on Tuesday recognized Nick Enger, Officer Chad Anderson and Sgt. Scott Kostohyryz in a ceremony for their life-saving efforts.

“I feel that my son is a gift,” said Kathy Enger, Lin’s wife. “He handled the situation with such dignity and grace.”

It was key that Nick knew to pull Lin onto the floor, where the CPR chest compressions would be more effective, Kathy and Lin said. Kathy also admired that her son prayed throughout the ordeal.

“Several times he yelled, ‘Bring him back!’ ” Kathy said. “He fought for his dad’s life.”

On Tuesday, Lin, who is an English professor at Minnesota State University Moorhead, said he felt fine. If his heart does act up, the defibrillator will administer a small shock, he said.

Lin doesn’t remember anything from that morning in November.

“I don’t have any recollection,” he said. “That’s 36 hours, gone.”

Doctors are still looking into what caused the heart attack, Lin said.

Nick realized that his dad would not be alive without his efforts but also said that he wasn’t the only one to save his father’s life.

“I feel like I did everything I could do, and I’m grateful,” Nick said.


Readers can reach Forum reporter Charly Haley at (701) 235-7311

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