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Curtis Eriksmoen


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Did You Know That: Bill Owen was known as the 'King of Trivia' PressPass

A man born and raised in North Dakota has succeeded on a national scale on radio, television, the movies, newspapers, and book authorship, but the recognition he appeared to be most proud of was the unofficial coronation as the King of Trivia.

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Did You Know That: A look at the remarkable life of ‘Marshal Bill’ Owen PressPass

It has been written that a tense situation for the Secret Service occurred in Bismarck in 1960 when a man approached presidential candidate John F. Kennedy with a pistol in each hand.

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Did You Know That: Never too late to return a favor PressPass

For some people, returning a favor may take a long time. I am one of those people. Nearly 40 years ago, in 1974, Wayne Lubenow wrote an article about me.

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Circuses, carnivals, 'Wild West' shows featured N.D. natives PressPass

A number of interesting individuals who lived in North Dakota found employment in various circuses, “Wild West” shows, and carnivals. In 1922, Hans Langseth, a farmer in Richland County, N.D., was judged to have the world’s longest beard, which measured 17 feet 4 inches. For a short time, he was showcased in the Ringling Brothers Circus, but quit to return to his farm and real estate business.

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Eriksmoen: Fargo native, lawyer credited with saving nation’s circus industry PressPass

The circus industry in North Dakota has provided entertainment and enjoyment to the state’s residents for more than 100 years.

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Eriksmoen: Former North Dakota coach worked to get Roosevelt re-elected PressPass

A former North Dakota football coach abandoned his career to try to help a former North Dakota rancher retake the White House.

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Eriksmoen: Former North Dakota residents changed game of football PressPass

Football was revolutionized in the early 20th century, largely because of the efforts of two people who once lived in North Dakota.

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Eriksmoen: ND woman was trailblazing journalist PressPass

A trailblazing female journalist was born and raised in North Dakota. It has been written that Emma “Bab” Lincoln was “the first woman reporter to cover the White House; the first American (correspondent) to cover the Paris fashion shows, and the first to develop and edit a women’s page as a regular segment of a major newspaper.”

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Eriksmoen: ‘World’s Fastest Man’ lost race in North Dakota in 1945 PressPass

"The World’s Fastest Man" lost a race in North Dakota in 1945. Because few humans could rival Jesse Owens on the racetrack, he lost the 150-yard event in Bismarck to a racehorse.

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Eriksmoen: Revisiting stories of friends who will be missed PressPass

Since this column began almost 10 years ago, a number of the individuals profiled in it have died.

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Columns

Small ND town of Sarles has ties to two state leaders PressPass

Only one organized town in North Dakota was named for a state governor. That town was also the birthplace of a future state executive.

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Eriksmoen: Businessman controlled monopoly of transportation, trade on ND river PressPass

For more than 20 years, one person’s monopoly of transportation and trade between Bismarck and Williston, N.D., was so complete that he was often referred to as “the man who owns the Missouri (River).”

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Eriksmoen: 121 years ago, ND baseball teams set a record that won't be broken PressPass

On July 18, 1891, two North Dakota pitchers for baseball teams in the Red River Valley League established a record that will never be broken.

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Eriksmoen: Looking for cold case clues PressPass

It is not uncommon that when I am in the process of laying out an article, I realize that critical information is missing and the article cannot be completed.

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Eriksmoen: ND woman saved empress from suicide PressPass

In 1880, seven years before becoming the wife of a North Dakota farmer, Marie Downing reportedly saved the life of the widow of a European emperor. Almost 80 years later, a journalist/author reconstructed the events leading up to Marie’s life-saving decision in Africa.

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Eriksmoen: North Dakota car salesman organized great sports teams PressPass

A Bismarck car salesman assembled the best baseball team in the history of North Dakota and arguably also put together the greatest basketball team in the state.

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North Dakota man became one of most popular authors of all time PressPass

A former professional boxer, born and raised in North Dakota, later became one of the most popular authors of all time. Louis L’Amour wrote all kinds of adventure stories, as well as poetry, but he was best know for his Western novels, many of which were turned into major motion pictures. By the time of his death in 1987, his books had sold more than 200 million copies, “making him the third top-seller in the world.”

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Eriksmoen: Murder, mystery surround Custer statues PressPass

What I call a mystery, some might call a curse. Four major attempts to memorialize George A. Custer with bronze, larger-than-life statues have resulted in strange twists.

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Eriksmoen: Six baseball Hall of Fame inductees played for teams in North Dakota PressPass

Six men who have been inducted into the baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, N.Y., played for teams in North Dakota.

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Eriksmoen: Legislator named seven North Dakota counties PressPass

The first legislator elected in northern Dakota Territory west of the Red River Valley was responsible for the names of seven counties in North Dakota.

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