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Published September 27, 2013, 12:00 AM

Louise (Frederick) Wichmann

Louise (Frederick) Wichmann, 95, of Brooklyn Center, MN, went to be with the Lord on Saturday, September 21, 2013, at North Memorial Hospital, Robbinsdale, MN. The funeral will be on Wednesday, October 2, 2103, at the Lutheran Church of the Master, 1200 69th Ave. N., Brooklyn Center, MN. The reviewal is from 10 to 11 a.m. with the funeral at 11, followed by lunch in the fellowship hall. Interment will be at the ND Veterans Cemetery in Mandan at a later date.

Louise and her twin sister, Mathilda, were born the youngest of six children to, Otto and Emilie (Hagen) Frederick, in Horace, ND, on August 31, 1918.

Louise (Frederick) Wichmann

Louise (Frederick) Wichmann, 95, of Brooklyn Center, MN, went to be with the Lord on Saturday, September 21, 2013, at North Memorial Hospital, Robbinsdale, MN. The funeral will be on Wednesday, October 2, 2103, at the Lutheran Church of the Master, 1200 69th Ave. N., Brooklyn Center, MN. The reviewal is from 10 to 11 a.m. with the funeral at 11, followed by lunch in the fellowship hall. Interment will be at the ND Veterans Cemetery in Mandan at a later date.

Louise and her twin sister, Mathilda, were born the youngest of six children to, Otto and Emilie (Hagen) Frederick, in Horace, ND, on August 31, 1918.

Because Otto worked at jobs that often kept him away from home, Louise and her siblings were raised primarily by their mother. These were the hard times of the Depression and all members of the family worked at whatever jobs were available to provide for the family. Louise and her sister, Mathilda, walked many miles to work for local farmers as kitchen helpers or wherever they were needed. The girls even went from door to door after school to sell lefse that their mother had made. Their mother’s sewing skills helped feed the family and enabled the children to be well dressed in garments made from old and discarded clothing. The sewing skills taught by her mother enabled Louise to become a skilled seamstress and to make most of her daughter’s dresses.

While working at a restaurant in Davenport Louise met and was courted by Lester Wichmann, the son of a local farmer. Lester went off to war in the Pacific with the 164th Infantry in 1942. When he returned he and Louise were married on July 17, 1946, at the First Lutheran Church in Fargo.

During Lester’s absence and after their marriage Louise worked as a sales person and buyer of children’s clothing at the Sears store in the Black Building in Fargo. Lester was stricken with polio in 1954, and in 1956 the family (which now included two daughters, Linda & Leah) moved to Minneapolis where Lester could be treated and also continue his job with the Ford Motor Company.

Shortly after moving into their new home in Brooklyn Center, Louise began working as a photo technician and later as a purchasing agent at Brown Photo. After retiring from Brown Photo, she worked at Johnson Jewlers part-time into her 80's. Louise was a meticulous housekeeper and maintained her yard in near perfect condition with many flowers. Her seamstress skills enabled her to make many of the clothes for her daughters in their younger years.

She was preceded in death by her parents; her husband, Lester; three brothers, Gerhard, Alfred, and Orville Frederick; and her sister, Twila Leitner. She is survived by her twin sister, Mathilde Penberthy, and daughters Linda (Jim) Oja, and Leah (Allan) Frederick.

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