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Published December 21, 2010, 12:00 AM

Photo gallery: Lunar eclipse


The eclipsed moon glows in the predawn sky Tuesday morning December 21, 2010 in this view from Stedman, NC. This picture is a 10 second time exposrure made through an amater astronomer's 12 1/2 inch Telescope. (AP Photo- The Fayetteville Observer- Johnny Horne)

  • The eclipsed moon glows in the predawn sky Tuesday morning December 21, 2010 in this view from Stedman, NC. This picture is a 10 second time exposrure made through an amater astronomer's 12 1/2 inch Telescope. (AP Photo- The Fayetteville Observer- Johnny Horne)
  • A partially eclipsed moon is seen over the Manhattan Bridge in New York, Tuesday, Dec. 21, 2010. A total lunar eclipse occurs when the Earth casts its shadow on the full moon, blocking the sun's rays that otherwise reflect off the moon's surface. Some indirect sunlight still pierces through to give the moon its eerie hue. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
  • In a photo provided by NASA the Washington Monument is seen as the full moon is shadowed by the Earth during a total lunar eclipse on the arrival of the winter solstice, Tuesday, December 21, 2010 in Washington. From beginning to end, the eclipse lasted about three hours and twenty-eight minutes. (AP Photo/NASA/Bill Ingalls)
  • The moon on its way to being totally eclipsed is seen with the Chrysler Building in the foreground in New York, Tuesday, Dec. 21, 2010. A total lunar eclipse occurs when the Earth casts its shadow on the full moon, blocking the sun's rays that otherwise reflect off the moon's surface. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
  • The lunar eclipse is seen with the steeple of Cathedral Basilica of Sts. Peter and Paul, at 3:59 a.m. EST Tuesday, Dec. 21, 2010 in Philadelphia. (AP Photo)
  • The moon is seen just before it is totally eclipsed from New York, Tuesday, Dec. 21, 2010. A total lunar eclipse occurs when the Earth casts its shadow on the full moon, blocking the sun's rays that otherwise reflect off the moon's surface. Some indirect sunlight still pierces through to give the moon its eerie hue. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
  • The moon is seen during a total lunar eclipse from New York, Tuesday, Dec. 21, 2010. A total lunar eclipse occurs when the Earth casts its shadow on the full moon, blocking the sun's rays that otherwise reflect off the moon's surface. Some indirect sunlight still pierces through to give the moon its reddish hue. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
  • The moon continues to emerge from a total eclipse at 4:39 a.m. EST near Archer,Fla., Tuesday, Dec. 21, 2010, (AP Photo/Phil Sandlin)
  • The moon continues to emerge from a total Lunar Eclipse near Archer ,Fla., Tuesday, Dec. 21, 2010 at 4:15 a.m. EST. (AP Photo/Phil Sandlin)
  • The moon is seen through supports for the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge between the Brooklyn and Staten Island boroughs of New York, during the lunar eclipse early Tuesday, Dec. 21, 2010. (AP Photo/David Boe)
  • The moon is seen through supports for the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge between the Brooklyn and Staten Island boroughs of New York, during the lunar eclipse early Tuesday, Dec. 21, 2010. (AP Photo/David Boe)
  • he moon appears totally covered by shadow as the earth passes between the moon and the sun, during the lunar eclipse in this Jan. 9, 2001 file photo taken in Kiel, Germany. On Tuesday Dec. 21, 2010 the first day of northern winter, the full Moon passes almost dead-center through Earth's shadow. The eclipse begins at 1:33 am EST. At that time, Earth's shadow will appear as a dark-red bite at the edge of the lunar disk. It takes about an hour for the "bite" to expand and swallow the entire Moon. Totality commences at 2:41 am EST and lasts for 72 minutes. According to NASA the last total lunar eclipse that happened on the winter solstice was Dec. 21, 1638. The next one will Dec. 21, 2094. (AP Photo/Heribert Proepper, File)