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2-year-old Edie thinks she's 30-something, or 60-something, or something

Two-year-old Edie Elizabeth is the right combination of spitfire and inherent sweetness. Jessie Veeder / The Forum1 / 2
Jessie Veeder, Coming Home columnist2 / 2

Yesterday, I told my 2-year-old that it was time to take a nap. She replied, of course, that she didn't want to. When I asked her why, she said, "Because it's too dangerous."

The day before I told her "never mind" after she asked me for the 40th time what I was doing. She replied, "Never mine? Oh, never yours."

My daughter calls the fly swatter a "shoo fly," and announces the presence of every bug within a 10-mile radius, demanding that I bring her the shoo fly to take care of every one. On nice days at home, this is about all we do.

Edie calls her rubber boots "scrubber boots," and I hope she never stops.

My 2-year-old thinks she's a 30-something mother or a 60-something grandmother, or a teenage girl, depending on her most recent and influential caretaker.

When she's wearing her jeans, boots and a hat, she's just like Chad, her dad that she often calls by his first name. She also calls him a queen, which is fun for us all. And as it turns out, when she's outside, she spits just like him, too. Discovered that little gem the other day.

Yes, little Edie Elizabeth transitions in and out of her personas with ease, keeping us on our toes. On our way home from town last week, she initiated conversation by asking, "How you doing girlfriend?"

That night at supper, her icebreaker of choice was, "So, how's your mom doing?"

Then she insisted that I take the cantaloupe off of her cantaloupe, proving that she is indeed a toddler after all.

And that's why these tiny humans are so amazing really, just the right miraculous combination of spitfire and inherent sweetness to keep us all on our toes.

For example, a few days ago she wrapped her skinny little arms around both her baby sister and I, declaring us her "best friends." About a half hour later, she must have changed her mind as she tested the waters by gently slapping her so called best-friend-baby-sister's cheeks.

These are the things parenting books don't prepare you for, these big personalities that come out of a tiny human you somehow had a hand in creating.

This morning, on our way into town, we passed a man sitting on a big ol' Harley in the parking lot of our little grocery store. He was a large man, bald, tattooed, wearing leather — a straight-out-of-the-textbook Harley-Davidson owner.

"Look Mommy, that guy's got a motorcycle," my daughter chirped from the back seat. "What's his name?' she asked, because she always wants to know, leaving me to make up a lot of characters to appease her.

"Larry," I lied. "I think his name is Larry."

"Yup, he's Larry," she replied. "He's perfect."

And then my heart swelled up big enough to leak out eyes that were seeing the world as Edie sees it... where naps are dangerous and strange biker men are perfect and I think I'll just enjoy this moment and worry about it later, like when she actually becomes a teenager.

Jessie Veeder is a musician and writer living with her husband and daughters on a ranch near Watford City, N.D. She blogs at https://veederranch.com. Readers can reach her at jessieveeder@gmail.com.

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