Sections

Weather Forecast

Close

Parents of Tom Bearson confident they'll get closure two years after his murder

1 / 2
2 / 2

FARGO - Two years and still no answers as to who killed NDSU Freshman Tom Bearson.

It's a murder that shocked the community, and had his parents living their worst nightmare of burying their youngest child.

"He was just adorable," said Debbie Bearson, Tom's mom.

An adorable baby boy, who his parents say grew up to be an athletic and driven young man.

"Just an amazing, amazing son. We were so blessed to have him for 18 years," said Greg Bearson, Tom's dad.

Those 18 years of basketball, track, and even a school musical cut short at the hands of a murderer.

"We do everything we can not to think about what happened to Tom. Granted from time to time, we have thought about it, but we do our darndest not to think about it," said Greg.

It all started September 20th when Tom was supposed to meet his parents around the Alexandria area, but he wasn't answering their calls.

Greg and Debbie knew something was wrong and got in the car and headed to Fargo.

"I cried the whole way to Fargo, I knew something was wrong, it didn't feel right," said Greg.

Then three days of what they would call living hell.

"I never put my phone down. Maybe to shower, I never let go of my phone. I just thought for sure. I had him put in as Tommy Boy and I thought for sure it was going to come up. I was just, I never let it go. Just kept waiting, it sat on my, if I laid down it sat there. I just never let it go," said Debbie.

"We weren't eating, we weren't sleeping. You're head goes to dark, dark places. Every minute seems like an hour," said Greg.

After three days, the moment when police had to break the terrible news.

"He asked us to stand up and hold hands, and that's when I broke down. I started saying no, no, no, I knew what he was going to say," said Greg.

September 23rd his body was found at an RV Lot in Moorhead, miles from where he was last seen; after an autopsy, authorities said he died of homicidal violence.

"You go back to another dark place because then you wonder what? What? Did he suffer? You keep going to these awful places because you don't know," said Debbie.

Authorities are left asking the same questions, they still don't know who killed him and aren't saying how he was killed.

"I believe we will know the answers, it's a matter of time. We just have to be patient, and just go about life. Tom doesn't want us to sit and wallow in the pits of despair, but I truly believe that we will get our answers," said Debbie.

The FBI, BCA, Fargo, Moorhead and NDSU police are all working on the case, keeping in contact with the family who are trying to live their life.

"His room is pretty much the way it was when he left. We say goodnight, shut the door. Say good morning Tom, that's still part of our lives, it will be for a very long time," said Debbie.

Just like the memories.

"My last spoken words to Tom, he was home here for the weekend before. He came running downstairs, he did everything fast. I jumped out of my chair and I have him a huge hug, I hugged him, he hugged me and I said 'Tom, I love you so much, you're gonna do great.' He said, 'Thanks pops, I love you too. Hope next time I see you, you have hair on your head,'" said Greg.

Greg's basement office is now filled with pictures.

"Love this picture; it's one of the last ones of Maddie and Tom together. So proud of them," said Greg, holding one up.

The last picture ever taken of their son, a class assignment.

"I always called him my little love bug, he was just the sweetest little guy growing up," said Debbie.

Debbie's little guy, murdered, with just as little information two years ago, as today.

"We remain very confident that there will be a resolution to the case," said Greg.

Moorhead police say this is still a very active investigation and not a cold case.

It would become a cold case once all possible leads have been exhausted.

The Bearson's have started a foundation in honor of their son. For more information, click here.

Jordan Schroeer

Born and rasied in Perham, MN, I have a connection with the area that goes for generations. I know what people in the region care about and will work tirelessly to deliver the news you want and need. After going to Minnesota State University Moorhead for broadcast journalism and political science, I jumped into the news cycle at WDAY. When I'm not obsessing over the latest information, I can be found going out for family karaoke (Dad and I sing a crowd-pleasing "Rawhide"), driving all over town to find garage sales or curb-side "junk" and watching home renovation shows. If you have any story ideas or would just like to chat, let me know and we'll get together for a conversation.

Advertisement
randomness