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Twitter suspends 235,000 more terrorism-related accounts

People holding mobile phones are silhouetted against a backdrop projected with the Twitter logo in this illustration picture taken in Warsaw September 27, 2013. REUTERS/Kacper Pempel/Illustration/File Photo GLOBAL BUSINESS WEEK AHEAD PACKAGE - SEARCH "BUSINESS WEEK AHEAD JULY 25" FOR ALL IMAGES - RTSJGEW

LOS ANGELES—Twitter said it has shut down 235,000 accounts in the last six months for violating its policies prohibiting the promotion of terrorism, as it looks to show that it's proactively responding to critics who charge that the social media service is a haven for extremist groups around the world advocating violence.

In February, Twitter said it had shut down more than 125,000 accounts since mid-2015 for violating its policy on terrorism, bringing the total number of suspensions for terrorism to 360,000 in the last year.

Daily suspensions of Twitter accounts are up over 80% since last year, with "spikes in suspensions immediately following terrorist attacks," according to the company.

"Our response time for suspending reported accounts, the amount of time these accounts are on Twitter, and the number of followers they accumulate have all decreased dramatically," Twitter said in a blog post. "We have also made progress in disrupting the ability of those suspended to immediately return to the platform."

Twitter said it is using proprietary anti-spam tools to supplement user reports to identify repeat account abuse, and the company said such automated tools have helped catch more than one-third of the accounts suspended for promoting terrorism. The company said it will provide regular updates on its fight against terrorism as part of its Transparency Report starting in 2017.

In addition, Twitter said its public policy team is working with an expanded set of partners to fight terrorism on the platform, including France's Parle-moi d'Islam, the U.K.'s Imams Online, Indonesia's Wahid Foundation, United Arab Emirates' Sawab Center and True Islam in the U.S.

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