HILLSBORO, N.D. — A slight breeze blew through Tim Kozojed's grass and soybeans Monday, June 21, which got three-quarters of an inch of steady rainfall over the weekend.

"The crop was starting to slow down a little bit," Kozojed said. "It was being really cautious with the moisture it had, and the warm temps had pushed it pretty hard, but it really needed a shot of rain."

Kozojed said his fields full of beans and corn have gotten hit with several inches of rain over the past month, and while his fields are staying lush and green, he said he's concerned about his neighbors about eight miles south of him.

"They're probably talking two inches less of rain in that neighborhood, and the crop will show it," Kozojed said.

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In Ada, Minn., which is just over 30 miles southeast of Hillsboro, Matthew Kitchell of DaKitch Farms said he got over an inch of rain, but the grass in his pastures is still dry.

Matthew Kitchell of Ada, Minn.'s cows chill out in his pasture, which still has dry grass, despite getting over an inch of rain Sunday, June 20. Photo courtesy of Matthew Kitchell
Matthew Kitchell of Ada, Minn.'s cows chill out in his pasture, which still has dry grass, despite getting over an inch of rain Sunday, June 20. Photo courtesy of Matthew Kitchell

He added if that dry trend continues, it could force him to sell his cows as early as August, since there would be less usable hay and feed to produce.

"When you've been in the (farming) business for 62 years, and you've been building your herd for that long, you might have to start looking at the lower end of possibly getting rid of them earlier than normal," Kitchell said.

Despite differing experiences, both Kitchell and Kozojed said they're thankful for any amount of rain, small or big, as the crop growth continues.

"This rain buys us another week or 10 days, probably, without going backwards," Kozojed said.