ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

North Dakota Main Street Summit prepares business owners for future

Through a series of talks and workshops, business owners were given tips on how to attract workers and adapt to the changing climate.

We are part of The Trust Project.

WEST FARGO — North Dakota's annual Main Street Summit was held at the Rustad Recreation Center Tuesday, Oct. 12. The summit brought together hundreds of people from around the area and offered them a look into what the state needs to do moving forward.

A major topic of conversation was the workforce and how to improve it.

"(There are) 30,000 open jobs in the state with $25 billion of capital expenditures planned for the state. That means it's only going to grow," said James Leiman, commissioner of the North Dakota Department of Commerce. "So we have to recruit workforce. We've got to get serious about migration or communities have to offer things that other states don't offer."

Through a series of talks and workshops, business owners were given tips on how to attract workers and adapt to the changing climate.

The state needs to make every effort it can to attract new families, Leiman said.

Related Topics: WORKPLACE
Ben Morris joined WDAY in June of 2021 as a news reporter. He grew up in southern New Hampshire, before he moved to Fargo. He majored in media communications and minored in marketing at the University of Toledo in Ohio.
What to read next
With four locations in North Dakota, Cal Helgeson, of Grand Forks, said he's kept roughly 2,000 broken hockey sticks on the ice, saving players and their families more than $400,000.
The last day of business will be Sunday, Dec. 4, for the eatery, which opened two years ago at the busy corner of Veterans Boulevard and 32nd Avenue East.
Maureen Robinson used to help sweep the floors when her mom ran Moler's Barber College and she later worked at Everett's Barbershop alongside sister Chelsey Ehlen. But now Robinson has headed north: She's bought Trollwood Barbers so she can cut hair in her beloved north Fargo.
The labor intensive nature of the work, the length of time it takes for an evergreen tree in North Dakota to grow to a saleable height, and the competition from “big box” stores are deterrents to raising Christmas trees, said Tom Claeys, North Dakota state forester.