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Prairie Business announces 2022's 40 Under 40 recipients

The annual awards honor young professionals in the Dakotas and western Minnesota, each under the age of 40.

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GRAND FORKS — Prairie Business has announced its 2022 40 Under 40 recipients.

The annual awards honor young professionals in the Dakotas and western Minnesota, each under the age of 40.

Those selected are business leaders, industry experts, executives, managers, nonprofit leaders and community trendsetters who have made significant impacts in their chosen professions and communities.

Prairie Business received nearly 1,700 nominations for 2022, making the selection process difficult. Listed below are the individuals and their organizations. Check out the December issue to read their profiles.

  • Derek Anderson (Apex Engineering Group, professional engineer)
  • Rob Ashe (Microsoft, director of business applications)
  • Mubashir Badar (Sanford, vice president/clinic)
  • Landon Bahl (322 Hospitality Group, Partner and director of business development)
  • Mallory Berdal (Alerus, banking operations manager)
  • McKenzy Braaten (EPIC Companies, vice president of communications)
  • Jessica Brewster (Heartview Foundation, chief operating officer)
  • William S. Cromarty (Aerial Robotics, director of business development)
  • Nic Cullen (Houston Engineering, project manager and certified floodplain manager)
  • Christy Dauer (North Dakota Women's Business Center, executive director)
  • Sean Dempsey (Dempsey's Brewery Pub and Restaurant, vice president/owner)
  • Lauren Deshler (Architecture Incorporated, principal architect)
  • Greg Dvorak (EAPC, mechanical engineer/production manager/project manager for industrial services group)
  • Cody Einerson (Mid Minnesota Federal Credit Union, business lender)
  • Alicia Fadley (Widseth, architect)
  • Thomas Fakler (Ulteig Engineers, technical manager)
  • Christin Fine (EERC, director of environment, health and safety)
  • Jake Fisketjon (Gate City Bank, retail manager and AVP senior mortgage officer)
  • Drew Flaagan (First International Bank and Trust, vice president/commercial loan officer)
  • Yvonne Fossen (North Star Community Credit Union, vice president of operations)
  • Matt Gehrtz (Gehrtz Construction Management, principal architect)
  • Jordan Grasser, PE (AE2S, operations manager)
  • James G. Hand (Construction Engineers, business developer)
  • Lori Hoerauf (Cornerstone Bank, vice president of operations)
  • Sarah Kenz (Titan Machinery, Talent acquisition manager)
  • Kathryn Kester (Xcel Energy, community relations manager)
  • Keith Leier (Kilbourne Group, vice president - development and construction)
  • Melissa Leuthold (Dakota Wesleyan University, adult and online enrollment coordinator)
  • Lucas Lorenzen (TSP, Inc., structural engineer)
  • Chelsey Matter (Blue Cross Blue Shield of North Dakota, executive director of government programs)
  • Tucker Norton (Kraus-Anderson Construction Co., senior project manager)
  • R.J. Pathroff (Vogel Law Firm, attorney)
  • Jeff Poulos (Digi-Key, vice president of order fulfillment)
  • Shawn Romo (Western Cooperative Credit Union, senior ag loan officer)
  • Megan Rupe (BeMobile, marketing team leader)
  • LaDawn Schmitt (Starion Bank, chief credit officer)
  • Tom Stadum (Fjell Capital, CEO and founder)
  • Mandy Sutton (Eide Bailly, CPA/partner)
  • Wade Thompson (KLJ Engineering, bridge group leader)
  • Tony Wolf (Zerr Berg Architects, principal architect)
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