FARGO — Doors are starting to open for Door Stud.

The firm, based at North Dakota State University’s Research and Technology Park, sells a unique dolly system that allows one or two people to quickly and safely move and install doors.

The tool — on the market since April 2018 — is sold online and in 40 states through outlets that include Acme Tools, Stan Houston Equipment Co., McMaster-Carr and Norfield, Sales Director Randy Anderson said.

RELATED:

WDAY logo
listen live
watch live

With the help of the U.S. Commercial Service, the company recently cracked the markets in the United Kingdom and in Canada, and is now working on Australia and New Zealand, Anderson said Monday, July 22.

“You have to be open enough to take advantage of what’s out there,” he said, though there is a learning curve.

“It takes a lot of legal work to go through other countries,” Anderson said.

The version of Door Stud that Randy Anderson, sales director, is holding Monday, July 22, in Fargo, will hold a door weighing up to 300 pounds. Michael Vosburg / Forum Photo Editor
The version of Door Stud that Randy Anderson, sales director, is holding Monday, July 22, in Fargo, will hold a door weighing up to 300 pounds. Michael Vosburg / Forum Photo Editor

Anderson credits Commercial Service North Dakota Director Heather Ranck with providing needed feedback and advice on distributor contract negotiations, pricing, shipping and customs clearance for the firm’s products to the UK.

Ranck “has been great,” Anderson said, helping the small firm get "the i’s dotted and the t’s crossed in international trade.”

The Door Stud currently comes in three versions — one can handle doors up to 300 pounds, and two others can support doors up to 600 pounds. However, the “heavy” version can hold a much-wider door.

The lightweight dolly wheels of the Door Stud can be easily slipped onto a door by one person and adjusted to securely hold the door. Other adjustments of the Door Stud make leveling, positioning and shimming a door easy.

All of that can be done without worrying about straining and lifting, jamming fingers or smashing toes, or having a door fall and hurting the installer or damaging walls or the door itself, said Anderson, who has been in the tool business for 35 years.

“A new tool that’s never been out there before, it’s rare,” Anderson said.

“Just the saving in dollars, time and safety,” are big selling points, he said.

For more information, visit www.thedoorstud.com.