FARGO — One of the biggest crowd-pleasers at the Fargo AirSho on Saturday, July 24, never left the ground.

But, boy, could it fly.

Shockwave, the jet-powered semi-truck driven by Chris Darnell, lived up to its name more than once during the day, including an afternoon performance in which the truck, powered by three jet engines that generate about 36,000 horsepower, defeated a propeller-driven biplane in a smoke- and fire-filled drag race down one of the runways at Fargo's Hector International Airport.

Chris Darnell of Springfield, Mo., stands with the Shockwave Jet Truck Saturday, July 24, 2021, during the Fargo AirSho at Hector International Airport. 
Michael Vosburg / Forum Photo Editor
Chris Darnell of Springfield, Mo., stands with the Shockwave Jet Truck Saturday, July 24, 2021, during the Fargo AirSho at Hector International Airport. Michael Vosburg / Forum Photo Editor

The truck has been known to reach speeds of 376 mph, but Darnell said it usually zooms around airshows at about 340-360 mph.

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Darnell, who operates the Springfield, Mo.-based Shockwave rig with his father, Neal, refers to the gleaming machine as "the king of all jet trucks," and says a sign that advertises 300 mph rides for $3,000 a pop finds more takers than one might think.

Chris Darnell, left, and another member of team Shockwave push the jet-powered truck to a parking area where it take a breather between shows at the Fargo AirSho Saturday, July 24, 2021. David Olson/The Forum.
Chris Darnell, left, and another member of team Shockwave push the jet-powered truck to a parking area where it take a breather between shows at the Fargo AirSho Saturday, July 24, 2021. David Olson/The Forum.

"I call it the assault of the senses,'' Darnell said, referring to the sensory overload created by the blasting sound and thrust of multiple jet engines.

The Fargo AirSho, which is headlined by the U.S. Navy's Blue Angels fighter squadron, continues Sunday.

The Blue Angels perform Saturday, July 24, 2021, during the Fargo AirSho at Hector International Airport. 
Michael Vosburg / Forum Photo Editor
The Blue Angels perform Saturday, July 24, 2021, during the Fargo AirSho at Hector International Airport. Michael Vosburg / Forum Photo Editor

For those planning to attend, a convenient place to park is the parking lot of the nearby Fargodome.

Among the ground-based attractions at the AirSho Saturday was a World War II-era Mitchell B-25 bomber that did not see combat during the war but has been transformed into a carbon copy of the "Miss Mitchell," a B-25 that flew more than 122 combat missions.

A B-25 bomber that has been modified to be a replica of a World War II-era bomber known as the "Miss Mitchell" was one of the static displays at the Fargo AirSho Saturday, July 24, 2021. David Olson/The Forum.
A B-25 bomber that has been modified to be a replica of a World War II-era bomber known as the "Miss Mitchell" was one of the static displays at the Fargo AirSho Saturday, July 24, 2021. David Olson/The Forum.

While the original "Miss Mitchell" survived the war, she met a violent end decades later when the military used the plane as a target for missile practice, according to Roger Van Ranst, a mechanic and a member of the team that shows the bomber at airshows around the country.

The Blue Angels perform Saturday, July 24, 2021, during the Fargo AirSho at Hector International Airport. 
Michael Vosburg / Forum Photo Editor
The Blue Angels perform Saturday, July 24, 2021, during the Fargo AirSho at Hector International Airport. Michael Vosburg / Forum Photo Editor

While the B-25 bomber gained fame as the plane used in a 1942 raid on Tokyo led by Lt. Col. James Doolittle, Van Ranst said many people he meets, especially younger generations, seem to have little to no awareness of Doolittle's raid, or even of the war itself.

Chris Stokes and son Jensen, 9, are photographed while in an F-18 cockpit Saturday, July 24, 2021, during the Fargo AirSho at Hector International Airport. 
Michael Vosburg / Forum Photo Editor
Chris Stokes and son Jensen, 9, are photographed while in an F-18 cockpit Saturday, July 24, 2021, during the Fargo AirSho at Hector International Airport. Michael Vosburg / Forum Photo Editor

"World War II, for the younger people, is something they've barely ever heard of," Ranst said.

Among the people taking in the AirSho Saturday were Casper Glaser and Joel Gustafson, who traveled from the Bismarck-Mandan area to attend the show.

The Blue Angels perform Saturday, July 24, 2021, during the Fargo AirSho at Hector International Airport. 
Michael Vosburg / Forum Photo Editor
The Blue Angels perform Saturday, July 24, 2021, during the Fargo AirSho at Hector International Airport. Michael Vosburg / Forum Photo Editor

As a Fargo AirSho attendee, Glaser was a repeat customer.

"I really enjoy them," he said of the airshows, adding: "I wish they'd bring one to Bismarck. They haven't had one for years."

Casper Glaser, left, and Joel Gustafson were among those taking in the 2021 Fargo AirSho on Saturday, July 24. David Olson/The Forum.
Casper Glaser, left, and Joel Gustafson were among those taking in the 2021 Fargo AirSho on Saturday, July 24. David Olson/The Forum.

A team from Skydive Fargo drift to the ground Saturday, July 24, 2021, during the Fargo AirSho at Hector International Airport. 
Michael Vosburg / Forum Photo Editor
A team from Skydive Fargo drift to the ground Saturday, July 24, 2021, during the Fargo AirSho at Hector International Airport. Michael Vosburg / Forum Photo Editor

For more information about the AirSho and the acts taking part this year, visit: www.fargoairsho.com.

If You Go

What: Fargo AirSho

When: July 24-25. Gates open at 9:30 a.m. each day. AirSho starts at about 11 a.m. Exact performance times vary due to the fluid nature of the show.

Where: Hector International Airport, Fargo.