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Honoring the man who kept the Fargo Marathon running

As the thousands of athletes run out of the Fargodome for the Fargo Marathon they will honor a man known for his dedication to the marathon over the years and his incredible integrity.

FARGO — When asked if 61-year-old Connie Lau was ready for her first-ever race, the Fargo Marathon 5K event she made it pretty clear.

"No, no," she said with a laugh.

However, she wasn't running for a medal, but to honor her late husband, Doug Lau. Their two sons also joined the event.

"We are so proud, we couldn't be more proud," she said.

Doug Lau is considered one of the key people who helped get the Fargo Marathon across the starting line nearly two decades ago. The long time employee of Coca-Cola helped form a very important sponsorship. Doug Lau never ran a race in his life, but he quickly became a key component of "running" the race to make sure it went off without a hitch.

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"We didn't see much of dad throughout this week, he was gone really early and didn't come back until late at night," recalled his son Chris Lau.

On race day, Doug Lau would setup the drink stations at 4 a.m. and wait until every runner had passed to take them down. Except one time one runner was too far behind, but Doug refused to leave him high and dry.

"Doug left paper cups along the route in case he needed water," said Connie Lau.

As runners leave the dome this year they will honor him as they pass under the Doug Lau Memorial Mile sign.

"Dad didn't do things for the accolades or the glory, he did it for his community," said his son Matt Lau.

A family and a community honoring the man who always kept the race running.

"I'm sure he has goose bumps," said Connie.

Related Topics: FARGO MARATHON
Matt Henson is an Emmy award-winning reporter/photographer/editor for WDAY. Prior to joining WDAY in 2019, Matt was the main anchor at WDAZ in Grand Forks for four years. He was born and raised in the suburbs of Philadelphia and attended college at Lyndon State College in northern Vermont, where he was recognized twice nationally, including first place, by the National Academy for Arts and Science for television production. Matt enjoys being a voice for the little guy. He focuses on crimes and courts and investigative stories. Just as often, he shares tear-jerking stories and stories of accomplishment. Matt enjoys traveling to small towns across North Dakota and Minnesota to share their stories. He can be reached at mhenson@wday.com and at 610-639-9215. When he's not at work (rare) Matt resides in Moorhead and enjoys spending time with his daughter, golfing and attending Bison and Sioux games.
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