Oops, she did it again.

Rachel Hollis is once again the author of a No. 1 best-selling book, her second time accomplishing the rare feat. Her March 5 release, "Girl, Stop Apologizing: A Shame-Free Plan for Embracing and Achieving Your Goals," now tops the charts of several lists and continues to generate buzz.

Her 2018 book, "Girl, Wash Your Face: Stop Believing the Lies About Who You Are so You Can Become Who You Were Meant to Be," sold 2.7 million copies last year, making the married mother of four a household name and sought-after voice as well as a subject of some criticism.

That rise to fame also brought the Texan to Fargo on Jan. 22, when she was the keynote speaker of the Fargo Moorhead West Fargo Chamber of Commerce's Women Connect series. Her appearance drew a sold-out crowd to the Sanford Health Athletic Complex in north Fargo, making it the biggest event yet hosted by the local Chamber — even beating the attendance at a 2017 event at the SHAC that featured basketball legend Shaquille O'Neal.

Author Rachel Hollis (left) recently sat down for an interview on "Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu." "Impact Theory" / Special to The Forum
Author Rachel Hollis (left) recently sat down for an interview on "Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu." "Impact Theory" / Special to The Forum"Impact Theory" / Special to The Forum

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As Hollis continues to burn up the book charts, online series "Impact Theory with Tom Bilyeu" recently caught up with the author for an interview that will debut Tuesday morning, March 19, on the series' YouTube channel.

"Impact Theory," a series that aims to "end poverty of poor mindset by enriching our society with ideas and objectives that positively impact the world," is headquartered in Bel Air, Calif. The brand's content has racked up more than 100 million views online.

"Impact Theory" agreed to share an exclusive clip from that unreleased interview with The Forum before it debuts. In the clip, Hollis discusses a challenge she heard from American author and strategist Tony Robbins that made her realize she had to be "small" to get love from her father while growing up.

As she got older and built up the blogging that would lead to eventual fame, she says she still felt the need to act "small" about her accomplishments, even as they got bigger and bigger. That's why Hollis says therapy has been "so freaking powerful" as a way to overcome those hangups and grow as a person.

"If you know why, you can learn how to navigate around something, but I think if you don't know the core of the problem, you can't move past it," she says.

Visit the series' website to view more interviews and watch for the new Hollis episode when it premieres March 19.