FARGO — My Heritage Deep Nostalgia has become a viral sensation in the last couple of weeks, helping users make history come to life like never before.

Thanks to our readers for sharing their loved ones with us.

The tool allows people to upload old photos, then the technology adds motion to the still image. Eyes blink and heads turn.

Last week, I tried it out on a few of my ancestors, and I invited Forum colleagues Emma Vatnsdal and Angie Wieck to join me in testing it out.

See how we did it:

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At the end of the story, I asked readers to submit their own Deep Nostalgia videos so we could share them with others. Thanks to those of you who played along.

(Do you ever get the sneaking suspicion that you are forgetting something? Did I leave your ancestor out? If you sent me an ancestor and I’m not including it in this story, I’m so sorry. I might have just been a little hypnotized by all of these weird old eyes staring back at me and lost track of it.)

So here are your newly animated ancestors with a paragraph describing who they are. It's been so interesting to learn more about the people who came before us. And in this case, we get to see them in a more lifelike way.

'Sweet, loving with a big smile'

“This is my Great Grandmother Flora Whaley on her wedding day. What a beautiful video to see her come to life!! I did know her, I was 6 when she passed away in 1971 . I have memories of her as very sweet, loving and a big smile. I remember her drawing pictures of her flowers in her yard. I hope to someday open a flower shop , using her name” - Connie Manis, Kansas.






"Why are you looking at me in such awe?"

— What Connie Manis thinks her ancestor Asa Lynch looks like he's saying in his animation.




Sometimes the way the technology animates the photos, the ancestors have a puzzled look on their faces, like Asa Lynch. Submitted photo
Sometimes the way the technology animates the photos, the ancestors have a puzzled look on their faces, like Asa Lynch. Submitted photo

“My Great Grandfather Asa Lynch , We think in the video He's say "Why are you looking at me in such awe?" His puzzled look wrinkling his eyebrows. That gave us a little laugh and a smile!!” Connie Manis - Kansas



'Raised 10 children on her own during The Great Depression'

Brian McClure uploaded a photo of his grandmother Agnes (center). She's pictured with Ella and Lily Anderson. All three women lived in the Fort Ransom, N.D. area. Submitted photo
Brian McClure uploaded a photo of his grandmother Agnes (center). She's pictured with Ella and Lily Anderson. All three women lived in the Fort Ransom, N.D. area. Submitted photo

Agnes (Lorentson) Larson appears in the middle of this photo with Ella and Lilly Anderson - all former residents of the Ft. Ransom, ND, area. The photo was perhaps taken between 1910 and 1916. Agnes’s parents were immigrants from Norway and they settled in the Ft. Ransom area in the late 1880’s.

Agnes married Carl Larson in 1918 and the couple lived on First street north in Fargo. They had ten children. Carl passed away in 1934. That meant that Agnes had to raise the ten children by herself during the Great Depression – a daunting task. However, Agnes did it. She was a wonderful cook and baker, but more importantly she exemplified kindness and a quiet, but steely, resolve to provide for her family.” - Agnes’ grandson Brian McClure.

Here is Agnes animated:



2 Cute Fargo brothers

Missy Youngs of Fargo submitted a photo of her father, Bill Daul and his brother Herb from the late ‘30s or early ‘40’s.

Bill (left) and Herb Daul in the late 1930s or early 1940s. Submitted photo
Bill (left) and Herb Daul in the late 1930s or early 1940s. Submitted photo

Herb eventually worked in printing in Fargo-Moorhead and Bill was a longtime Fargo firefighter.

Here is Bill animated."

Thanks again to all of you who shared your photos with us. If you'd like to try the site out, go to My Heritage Deep Nostalgia

Have you tried to animate your ancestors on My Heritage Deep Nostalgia?

Thank you for voting!

  • Yes, it was both creepy and cool

    27%

  • No, I haven't gotten around to it, can't find any photos or I'm not really interested in family history

    9%

  • No, but I'd like to try

    64%



Other stories by Tracy Briggs:

80 years ago, the Ides of March Blizzard killed 72 in the Red River Valley

In 1966, Moorhead college students staged a huge protest over 'The Sound of Music,' but why?

BTS conquers the music world while doing their darndest to make it a better place, and one West Fargo fan is along for the ride