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30-year-old 'Parks and Recreation' producer found dead of suspected overdose

LOS ANGELES - Harris Wittels, known for co-exec producing "Parks & Recreation" and for his work on other comedies, has died of a possible drug overdose, sources confirm. He was 30.

Wittels
Harris Wittels. Special to The Forum

LOS ANGELES - Harris Wittels, known for co-exec producing "Parks & Recreation" and for his work on other comedies, has died of a possible drug overdose, sources confirm. He was 30.

According to the Los Angeles Police Department, Wittels was found by his assistant at around noon Thursday at his home in the Los Feliz area. Wittels was open about his struggles with drug addiction, speaking about them on Marc Maron's "WTF" podcast last September, and he had been to rehab twice.

Along with serving as a co-executive producer on NBC's "Parks and Recreation," Wittels produced and wrote for "The Sarah Silverman Program," "Eastbound and Down" and "Secret Girlfriend." He was also a recurring guest on the podcast "Comedy Bang Bang."

"Parks and Recreation" will air its final episode Tuesday. He also appeared in the show in a small role as an incompetent animal control employee.

The Houston native has a large Twitter following, and he is credited with creating the popular term "Humblebrag." In 2012 he published "Humblebrag: The Art of False Modesty," based on the tweets culled from a Twitter account he ran.

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Wittels also performed standup comedy, played drums and provided backup vocals for musical group Don't Stop or We'll Die with fellow comedians Michael Cassady and Paul Rust. The trio was scheduled for a performance at the UCB Theater on Feb. 28.

TMZ first reported the news.

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