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Couple adds unique mix of old, new to bilevel

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Kelly and Scott Krenzel’s home in south Fargo is filled with handmade craft items and also found items from thrift stores. Dave Wallis / The Forum

FARGO – Kelly and Scott Krenzel weren’t in the market for a house when they found their new home.
The couple got married last April, and after paying for the wedding, they weren’t looking to make any big purchases.
But when Kelly heard her longtime friends were retiring and wanted to sell their house in south Fargo – a house where Kelly had spent holidays when she couldn’t go back home to her own family in Bismarck – the Krenzels decided to take the plunge.
“It was fun then to bring them back and have them over for dinner and see this whole cycle of just how much my life had changed and how much theirs had changed,” she said.
Scott was out of town when his wife first heard about the house, and said he knew as soon as she called that this would become their home – even if he had never seen it before.
Now, the Krenzels are working together to add a personal touch to the large bilevel built in 1993 that they’ve called home since July.
A touch of style

The couple has plans to update certain aspects of the house, and Scott has already started on some projects.
He tore out the old carpet in the upstairs bathroom last year, installing a high-grade tile with the help of his father that brings a modern feel to the room. New cabinet pulls on the vanity, a new mirror and a fresh coat of paint updated the look, too.
Eventually, the couple wants to buy new kitchen appliances, install a backsplash and replace the countertop to make the kitchen fit their style, and Scott has big plans for the large garden in the spacious backyard this summer.
But even without extensive remodeling, Kelly’s creative vision and Scott’s assistance have resulted in a unique mix of styles, furniture from different eras and knickknacks from relatives and thrift stores alike that make the house stand out already.

The dining room, for example, boasts an old table the couple picked for its character. Four upholstered chairs Kelly bought at a thrift store a few years ago add some contrast, while a repurposed dresser serves as a handy buffet.
One wall is covered with more than a dozen framed photos showing family members, and each frame is different – those, too, were bought at thrift stores and reused.
A bar cart in the corner of the room offers more space for displaying glassware and serving up drinks whenever the Krenzels host friends or family, which has been quite often since they moved.
The personal touches, and mix of old and new, continue throughout the house.
In the family room downstairs, Scott found a place to hang an antique painting he discovered in his late uncle’s cabinet shop, while Kelly put up favorite photos of her grandmother in several rooms.
Thrift store purchases that became decorations at the couple’s wedding last year have found another life in the Krenzel household, like the banner Kelly made of their last name accented with cut-up old sheet music that now serves as decorative pennants in the upstairs office.
Room to grow

Kelly isn’t sure how to describe her style that’s guided the couple as they furnished and arranged the house, but it’s clear she has a vision.
“I love vintage things, but I also like to repurpose and reuse things we already have,” she said. “I mean, if he would let me do whatever I wanted, we’d probably be living in a 90-year-old lady’s house with flowered couches and stuff, but I try to be a little bit conscious that I’m married.”
Scott has an easier time describing the look.
“Kelly Allensworth is the style,” he said, referring to his wife’s maiden name. “It’s just kind of all over the place, but it looks really cool.”
He’s come a long way since his “bachelor pad” days, he said, when his apartments had empty walls. Now, Scott will send a picture of funky things he finds in thrift stores, and while Kelly doesn’t always approve, he’s found good buys that accent the house.
“She’s got the eye, and I’m learning,” he said with a laugh.
Kelly has a self-described love of “weird things,” like a random small picture of a bird that now is framed and standing on a basement shelf or the sticks she collected and spray-painted at Christmastime that rise up above a corner of the family room.
“I don’t really know if that’s considered style,” she said, with Scott countering, “It’s art.”
Since they started dating three and a half years ago, Kelly said she’s gotten Scott on board with her love of thrift store shopping. Now, the couple makes a day of it and hits local stores to find new treasures.
They hadn’t really planned on it, but the Krenzels said the former house of Kelly’s friends has become their own unique home where she’s started to bake and try new recipes.
“The most fun part for me is to have spent time in this house before and to know the people that owned it, that raised a family here,” she said. “They lived here for 17 years, I think, and now we’re able to pass on that tradition of love.”
For now, it’s the perfect place for the couple to live, entertain and make plans for the future. But it probably won’t be long until the house gets another personalized touch – the Krenzels want to have kids soon, and Scott said the four-bedroom house is the kind of place they can stay for years to come.
“There will be some little ones running around here sooner or later,” he said.

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Kelly and Scott Krenzel’s home in south Fargo is filled with handmade craft items and also found items from thrift stores. Dave Wallis / The Forum

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