ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Detroit Mountain planning 'bike-in movie'

DETROIT LAKES, Minn. -- Detroit Mountain is holding its first ever 'bike-in movie theater.'Rental Manager and Trails Boss Tony Schmitz said they are "just trying to get new activities happening and bring people out." "We are hoping this generates...

2692061+rsz_detroitmountain (1).jpg
Detroit Mountain is hosting the first ever bike in movie theater July 29th. File photo.
We are part of The Trust Project.

DETROIT LAKES, Minn. -- Detroit Mountain is holding its first ever ‘bike-in movie theater.’

Rental Manager and Trails Boss Tony Schmitz said they are “just trying to get new activities happening and bring people out.”

“We are hoping this generates more excitement and buzz and gets people fired up about mountain biking or being active,” Detroit Mountain Guest Services Manager Megan Smith, said

Detroit Mountain will be showing the family friendly movie ‘Not 2 Bad’ Friday, July 29, at 8:30 p.m., rain or shine.

The movie is 30 minutes long and is about mountain biking, where mountain bike rider Brandon Semenuk, is the main character in the movie.

ADVERTISEMENT

The Mountain staff will have beverages and food to purchase. Visitors can bring their own lawn chairs.

Tickets are being sold at bike shops, online and at Detroit Mountain, where the voucher includes one free beverage and an automatic entry at a chance to win some Detroit Mountain gear.  

Not only is there going to be a movie playing, but Detroit Mountain will also be having the bike lift going before the movie for $5.

This will give people a chance to enjoy a scenic lift ride before they sit and relax at the ‘bike in movie theater’.

If this first ‘bike-in movie theater’  proves to be a hit, Smith and Schmitz said they are hoping to  make this an annual event.

What to read next
“We’re excited for people to view the exhibit and explore at your own pace,” YWCA communications manager Allison Pillar said, adding she hopes the exhibit will encourage people to have conversations and look for ways to increase diversity.
“To get the bigger acts, you’ve got to pay for it," Cody Cashman, CEO of the RRVF Association, says about this year's lineup in West Fargo.
The Arts Partnership interviews the visual artist and trained biologist about his approach, influences and past work experience as a software engineer.
Members Only
Curt Eriksmoen's "Did You Know That" column shares the story of Gene Holter, who grew up in Jamestown and went on to train animals that frequently appeared in TV shows and movies.