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'Fargo' star Kirsten Dunst slams Hollywood blockbusters

LOS ANGELES - Kirsten Dunst is no stranger to big-budget studio movies, having starred in Sam Raimi's "Spider-Man" trilogy, among countless other films -- but her next major role is on the sm...

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Cast member Kirsten Dunst speaks via satellite during a panel for the FX Networks television series "Fargo" during the Television Critics Association Cable Summer Press Tour in Beverly Hills, California August 7, 2015. REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni

LOS ANGELES - Kirsten Dunst is no stranger to big-budget studio movies, having starred in Sam Raimi's "Spider-Man" trilogy, among countless other films -- but her next major role is on the small screen, where she'll star in season two of FX's "Fargo."

In a recent interview with the UK's Guardian newspaper, Dunst admits that she's become a little disillusioned with the film industry. "People don't go to the cinema unless it's an event any more," she says. "So the movie industry is in a weird place, for sure, and the creative people are blossoming on television."

Her theory for that shift is that "there are just too many movies being made, I think. So many of them get lost. Too many cooks in the kitchen - the studio's editing it, the producers are editing it, the director's editing, too. But everyone has their hand in it, so whose movie is it at the end of the day?" Dunst thinks this leads to "homogenized" films, where creativity takes a backseat to the money being thrown at the screen.

"People don't need all the money they're using. That's the other thing: when you have too much time, too much money, the creative starts to slip away," she notes.

But TV isn't a downgrade, Dunst says -- in many ways, it's more challenging. "Doing a television show is much, much harder work than film, because you're doing 10 pages a day. You don't get that many takes. And my character does not stop talking."

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"Fargo" season two premieres Monday, Oct. 12 on FX.

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