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North Dakota Museum of Art reopens with launch of 'Art in Isolation' exhibition

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At the North Dakota Museum of Art, some images in the "Art in Isolation" exhibition reveal people's creative responses to the effect of the pandemic on their lives. Photo by Matthew Anderson

GRAND FORKS — The North Dakota Museum of Art reopened Tuesday, Sept. 29, with the launch of a new exhibition, “Art in Isolation,” developed in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

The exhibition consists of assemblages of images submitted by artists and others in 35 countries around the world, including Portugal and Russia, as well as area communities, said Matthew Anderson, the museum’s director of education.

Last spring, museum staff members issued an online invitation to people asking them to submit images of how they were expressing their creativity during quarantine.

“Thousands of images started arriving from around the world... The images describe an outpouring of creative expression," said Anderson, adding that the pandemic has caused unanticipated change. “Change also fuels creativity, and that is what the North Dakota Museum of Art brought to light.”

As part of the launch of the “Art in Isolation” exhibition, the museum is asking visitors to donate a nonperishable food item to give to those in need and place it in drop boxes in the entry. Anyone who is in need may pick up a food item after viewing the exhibition; all remaining items will be donated to local food banks.

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The exhibition runs through Wednesday, Oct. 7.

Other exhibitions include “Consequences,” with artwork by Lynne Allen, a descendant of the Hunkpapa band of the Lakota on Standing Rock. In the late 1990s, after reading the journals of her great-grandmother, Josephine Waggoner, Allen began making objects that reflect the culture in those writings. These objects were crafted from paper, cut and stitched to shape and lacquered with shellac or from recycled vellum printed with images copied from Waggoner’s journals.

The museum is presenting more than 20 major prints by Allen, an internationally known printmaker, Anderson said.

The “Celebration” exhibition features artwork from the museum’s permanent collection, including Julie Buffalohead’s “Stolen Sisters,” a 4-by-18-foot, mural-sized acquisition that anchors the show. It illustrates the use of acrylic paint, ink, graphite and collage, applied to Nepalese Lokta paper, which has been used in Nepal since the 12th century to write epic tales, print mantra for use in prayer wheels and religious texts chanted by Buddhist monks.

The museum, located on the University of North Dakota campus south of Twamley Hall, had been closed to the public since mid-March.

When the facility reopens, new hours will be from noon to 4 p.m. Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Sundays.

The museum will be following CDC guidelines and working with UND officials to help prevent the spread of COVID-19, Anderson said. Visitors will be required to wear face masks and encouraged to practice social distancing.

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Related Topics: ART
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