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Parenting Perspectives: Twins enter world with a whoosh and a rush

A pregnancy fear of mine was to not make it to the hospital on time for our twins boys to be born.

Big brother Carter holds his twin brothers, Cooper and Mac. Photo special to The Forum
Big brother Carter holds his twin brothers, Cooper and Mac. Photo special to The Forum

A pregnancy fear of mine was to not make it to the hospital on time for our twins boys to be born.

You hear the stories of people having babies in the back of a minivan because the babies were coming too quickly and think, "I sure hope that isn't me." Well our twin babies came rushing into the world in a frenzy in the early morning of March 23.

I had one of the best night's sleep I have had since measuring past 44 weeks, though I was only 33 weeks and 5 days pregnant when I stood up after a restful night's sleep to discover the biggest unmistakable whoosh of water hitting the floor.

My first thought was panic. Not yet. It's too early. Yet, there was also a sense of relief. Each and every step I took at this stage of pregnancy with twins was worth it, but painful, very painful.

I yelled at my husband, "Get ready! We have to go to the hospital!" My husband, admittedly, paced back and forth twice upstairs before actually realizing what he should be doing. He got our older son ready, grabbed our hospital bag and we were out the door in about 15 minutes.

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We basically skipped triage and went straight to prep for an emergency cesarean since one baby was breach. Less than 35 minutes after arriving at the hospital and I was rolling back for surgery, all thanks to a star labor and delivery nurse named Starla. She knew how to take charge of the urgent matter and repeatedly called out for what she needed to get me into delivery. The babies were well on their way and she said, "We are not having babies in this room!"

Finally, our baby boys were born. Cooper was 5 pounds 13 ounces and was born at 7:51 a.m. and Cormac "Mac" was 5 pounds 7 ounces and was born at 7:52 a.m. Both appeared to be fine, but were premature and needed some tender care. Mac had a little trouble breathing and needed some oxygen for a couple of weeks. Cooper's lungs were developed fully but needed time to grow, gain weight and learn to eat without an NG tube.

It's interesting the personalities that come out at such a young age. We can already tell that Mac is laid back, but also a spitfire. Cooper is quirky and squeaky, but very sweet. They both seem to be quite content babies, but I'm sure that might change as they get older, their appetites increase, and they sleep less.

Their older brother Carter is excited to be a big brother. He calls them, "his babies" and gives them plenty of kisses. So far, his only experience is going to see them in the NICU so I'm not sure he fully understands yet that these two little guys will be joining us at home, but soon enough he will.

We hope it's sooner than later because life in a NICU is pretty draining and exhausting for families. I could share much more about this experience, but honestly that's an entirely different column, which I hope to share with you sometime.

For now, I better get back to these babies. We have important things to do, like feeding, diaper changes, temperature checks, snuggling and loving on those chubby cheeks.

Kerri Kava is mom to 7-year-old son Carter, who lives with Williams syndrome, and twin newborns, Cooper and Mac. She can be reached at kerrikava18@gmail.com .

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Big brother Carter holds his twin brothers, Cooper and Mac. Photo special to The Forum
Kerri Kava

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