Anne Frank was never sure her writing was good enough for newspapers or books. It was. In fact, her diary of life as a Jew in hiding during WWII was rated in seventh in Good Reads' "Best Books of the 20th Century."

She made her last diary entry, for that book, on this date in 1944.

Frank and her family were originally from Frankfurt, Germany, but eventually moved to the Netherlands to escape Adolph Hitler and the Nazis. Anne's father, Otto Frank, formed a pectin company, and Anne and her older sister Margot learned Dutch and went to school.

But by 1940, the Nazis had invaded the Netherlands. The Franks went into hiding behind Otto's store.

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Anne began writing a journal of her experiences in hiding, including the guilt she had for sleeping in a warm bed while friends and relatives had been sent to concentration camps. But she would soon join them.

On Aug. 4, Frank, her family and others who shared their hiding place were found and sent to Auschwitz. By November 1944, Anne and Margot were sent to Bergen-Belsen where they would both die of typhus in February 1945. Anne's mother Edith died at Auschwitz.

Otto Frank, Anne Frank's father, visits the place where his family hid from Nazis during World War II. The photo was taken May 9, 1958. Two years later, the hiding place was turned into a museum. Flickr / Special to the Forum
Otto Frank, Anne Frank's father, visits the place where his family hid from Nazis during World War II. The photo was taken May 9, 1958. Two years later, the hiding place was turned into a museum. Flickr / Special to the Forum

Otto Frank survived. By 1947 friends had convinced him to publish Anne's diary. Since then, her "Diary of a Young Girl" has been translated into 70 languages and adapted for stage and screen. By 1960, the Franks' secret hiding place was turned into a museum, Anne Frank House.

According to AnneFrank.org, until his death in 1980, Otto Frank worked closely with curators of the Anne Frank House and hoped both visitors to it and readers of his daughter's diary would become aware of the dangers of discrimination, racism and hatred of Jews.