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Make your own cotton candy: Simple device lets you create various flavors

Nostalgia Electric's Cotton Candy Maker can give you a first-rate cotton-candy making experience in your home - no carnival or fair required. This counter-top cotton candy maker system is simple to set up and begin to use.

Nostalgia Electric's Cotton Candy Maker can give you a first-rate cotton-candy making experience in your home - no carnival or fair required. This counter-top cotton candy maker system is simple to set up and begin to use.

However, the cotton candy maker does not come with a start-up supply of hard candies - imagine that! - so you will need to have these on hand or go out and purchase your own as you eagerly, almost anxiously, await your first use. Your selection of hard candy choices can be pivotal, especially if you are interested in producing unique cotton-candy flavors, such as butterscotch or peppermint; can't find those at a fair!

While it may be wise to keep your hard candies stashed away, you only need a handful to start your cotton-candy making. Allow the system to warm up for approximately five minutes (as recommended) and then put two hard candies in the extractor unit to allow them to begin to melt. Within minutes, cotton candy strands will begin to shoot out (but within confinement of the plastic rim guard) and you'll be spinning the threads onto one of the provided plastic sticks.

Unlike a true cotton candy maker, this machine does require a bit of patience to be able to collect enough cotton candy strands to equate to a substantial amount of fluff. The machine also has to be turned off and on again to allow for every addition of two hard candy pieces. However, sugar-free hard candies and flavored sugar can also be used, which is a plus.

Priced at $39.99 through Bed Bath & Beyond, this Nostalgia Electric Cotton Candy Maker can be a unique and entertaining at-home item whether that's for special occasions or simply to delight your friends, visitors, and children.

Related Topics: FOOD
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