ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

MARIJUANA

On this episode of Plain Talk, we discuss the jolt of excitement North Dakota's general election ballot just received from a couple of independent candidates, and the approval of a measure legalizing recreational marijuana. We also discuss Rep. Liz Cheney losing in the Wyoming primary.
In the past month, the cities of Marshall, Robbinsdale and St. Joseph approved moratoriums on sales. Other cities across Minnesota are also considering moratoriums as they weigh how they'll tackle enforcement.
Gummies and edibles from the program are separate from the hemp-derived edible cannabis products that became legal in Minnesota at the beginning of July.
Some changes have scaled back allowable serving sizes and offerings in the state.

ADVERTISEMENT

Latest Headlines
The meeting, which convened just over a year after the beginning of the state's Medical Cannabis Program, covered budget issues, accreditation of dispensaries and the availability of physicians to prospective cardholders.
New Approach North Dakota’s proposed measure would legalize the possession and purchase of small amounts of marijuana for adults 21 and older.
Some have called the quasi-legalization a distinctly Minnesota version of recreational pot, dubbing it “3.2 cannabis.”
David Owen, the chairman of the measure campaign, told me today that they feel they have at least 21,400 signatures, and probably more as additional completed measures flow into organizers over the weekend.
State lawmakers approved the policy allowing adults 21 and older to buy hemp-derived THC products with few provisions that spell out how the state will ensure compliance. Now, the bill's author says local governments should decide how they want to enforce it.
Lawmakers that helped push the new rule through the Minnesota Capitol said they were working on fixes around enforcement, next steps to fully legalize marijuana for adult use.

ADVERTISEMENT

Under the new law, people 21 and older can buy products containing servings of up to 5 milligrams of THC. A single package of edibles — or drinkables — may not contain more than 50 milligrams.
Legal medical marijuana sales officially began in Minnesota on July 1, 2015, but at the time it was signed into law by then-Gov. Mark Dayton, the state legislation that authorized those sales was widely considered the most restrictive of its kind in the nation. That's now changed.
The group behind a proposed ballot measure to legalize recreational marijuana in North Dakota has raised more than $500,000 to support its effort. Most of the campaign funds come from pro-pot organizations located in Washington, D.C.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT