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New NASA Site Features Daily Full-Color Photos of the Rotating Earth

NASA launched a new website this week you're gonna love. It features 10 or more new color pictures of the planet Earth taken every day from a million miles...

NASA launched a new website this week you're gonna love. It features 10 or more new color pictures of the planet Earth taken every day from a million miles away by the EPIC camera on board the DSCOVR Observatory .

 

At that distance, we see one entire face of our beautiful blue planet. At the site, you can click through images individually or select Play and watch Earth turn before your eyes. EPIC, which stands for Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera, shoots 10 images in different parts of the spectrum of Earth's sunlit face using a 4-megapixel, camera-like chip coupled to an 11.8-inch (30-cm) Cassegrain design  reflecting telescope. The color Earth images are created by combining three separate single-color images to create a photographic-quality image equivalent to a 12-megapixel camera.

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"The effective resolution of the DSCOVR EPIC camera is somewhere between 6.2 and 9.4 miles (10 and 15 km)," said Adam Szabo, DSCOVR project scientist at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center.

The DSCOVR spacecraft orbits about a stable spot 932,000 miles (1.5 million km) sunward of Earth called the L1 Lagrange Point , where the gravitational pulls of the sun and Earth cancel out. The location gives gives EPIC's eye a continuous, full-disk view of Earth, perfect for monitoring ozone levels, aerosols, cloud reflectivity and height, vegetation properties, and how much UV radiation strikes the planet's surface.

As DSCOVR keeps an eye for changes and trends on Earth, we can sit back at the computer and enjoy daily full-disk color photos. When you move your cursor over the photo, it becomes a magnifying glass. What a great way to learn geography and watch hurricanes, dust storms, weather fronts and the movements of the clouds. Each image includes a little guide identifying the continents. You can also see the daily images on Twitter at   #DSCOVR .

We usually talk here about what you can see looking up, but sometimes looking down can be just as inspirational.

 

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