1. Mayors urge Fargo-Moorhead area to prepare, but not panic over coronavirus

Fargo Mayor Tim Mahoney and other area mayors are urging residents to "remain calm," saying they are working with public health officials on plans in case the novel coronavirus becomes a local problem.

The theme of a presentation leaders gave Wednesday, March 4, at the Fargo Cass Public Health office was "preparing, not panicking."

"We have full trust and confidence in our public health officials to respond to this potential threat," Mahoney said. "Our unified teams are preparing, not panicking for the coronavirus."

Read more from The Forum's Barry Amundson

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2. Suspect dies after complaining of breathing trouble during Moorhead arrest

The Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension is investigating the death of a man who said he had trouble breathing while being arrested on outstanding felony warrants in Moorhead Tuesday, March 3.

Officers with the High Plains Fugitive Task Force were taking the man into custody in a residential area near the Concordia College campus around 1 p.m. Tuesday when he complained of shortness of breath, according to a news release from the Minnesota Department of Public Safety.

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3. ND K-12 leader opens up on decision to enter treatment after DUI arrest

North Dakota Superintendent of Public Instruction Kirsten Baesler spoke with The Forum Wednesday, March 4, about her driving under the influence arrest that unfolded Feb. 26 in Bismarck, as well as her plans to seek treatment while continue her work for the state. Jeremy Turley/ Forum News Service
North Dakota Superintendent of Public Instruction Kirsten Baesler spoke with The Forum Wednesday, March 4, about her driving under the influence arrest that unfolded Feb. 26 in Bismarck, as well as her plans to seek treatment while continue her work for the state. Jeremy Turley/ Forum News Service

A Republican fundraiser that was held in Jamestown Saturday, Feb. 29, involved North Dakota’s top K-12 education official signing wine bottles just days after she was arrested on suspicion of driving drunk.

The wine bottles were not meant to make light of alcoholism or the crime's seriousness, said state House Majority Leader Chet Pollert.

Kirsten Baesler, superintendent of public instruction who faces pending charges of driving under the influence for a Feb. 26 stop along Interstate 94 in Bismarck, was the keynote speaker at the Lincoln Day Dinner held at the Jamestown Knights of Columbus for Republicans in Districts 12 and 29.

Read more from The Forum's April Baumgarten

4. Two members of 'The Exonerated Five' share their story

 Raymond Santana, left, and Yusef Salaam, two of the men formerly referred to as “The Central Park Five,” join Dr. Tamba-Kuii Bailey, an assistant professor of education, health and behavior at UND in a conversation at the Chester Fritz Auditorium Wednesday. Photo by Eric Hylden/Grand Forks Herald
Raymond Santana, left, and Yusef Salaam, two of the men formerly referred to as “The Central Park Five,” join Dr. Tamba-Kuii Bailey, an assistant professor of education, health and behavior at UND in a conversation at the Chester Fritz Auditorium Wednesday. Photo by Eric Hylden/Grand Forks Herald

Raymond Santana and Yusef Salaam were teenagers when they were tried and convicted for a crime they didn’t commit.

Life before April 19, 1989, was normal for Santana and Salaam. They liked art and skateboarding and trying to impress girls.

But that night, a young woman was brutally raped and left for dead in New York City’s Central Park. Santana, Salaam and the other members of the group that became known as the Central Park 5 were tried and convicted. There was no DNA or physical evidence that tied them to the crime, yet they were sent to prison.

Read more from Forum News Service's Sydney Mook

5. A feel for art: Mike Marth brings textured work to the Rourke

Mike Marth burned polystyrene to create a textured surface before adding seedpods for his new piece of art. Special to The Forum
Mike Marth burned polystyrene to create a textured surface before adding seedpods for his new piece of art. Special to The Forum

Before his new show at the Rourke Art Gallery + Museum was hung, Mike Marth looked at the pieces laid out on the floor.

“I wish people could touch the works in this show,” he says, then adds, ���Gently.”

It’s easy to see why he wants viewers to get up close to his sculptural paintings.

Jonathan Rutter, executive director and curator at the Moorhead institution, sees it, too.

“With his work, it’s always intense textures,” Rutter says. “You can clearly tell the materials he’s using, but there is some illusionary effect. That’s part of the fun of looking at Mike’s work, wondering what it is and if he made it.”

Read more from The Forum's John Lamb