1. Fargo's doctors, nurses risk mental health wounds as they fight to save COVID-19 patients

FARGO — The faces of the doctors and nurses caring for patients in the COVID-19 unit at Sanford Broadway Medical Center are like monitors displaying the vital signs of their emotions as they deal with death and suffering.

“You can see the look on the faces of not only the patients, because they're fearful, you look on the faces of your colleagues who are nurses, they’re terrified, and they’re exhausted," said Dr. Rishi Seth, one of the physicians in the unit. "You look on the faces of your colleagues, the physicians, and they’re stressed and they’re fearful of the patients not surviving. Those are the really bad days.”

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2. Tuberculosis pandemic had some North Dakota schools trying open air classrooms in the winter of 1922-23

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To prevent the spread of tuberculosis, many American schools, including some in North Dakota, opened all of their windows, even in the cold of winter. This is a classroom in Manhattan. Photo courtesy: Library of  Congress
To prevent the spread of tuberculosis, many American schools, including some in North Dakota, opened all of their windows, even in the cold of winter. This is a classroom in Manhattan. Photo courtesy: Library of Congress

FARGO — While millions of American children are staying healthy and safe this year through distance learning, their great- or great-great-grandparents did something a little different: They opened all the windows and wore sleeping bags to school.

In 1922, some schools opted to move classrooms outdoors to try to prevent and combat the spread of tuberculosis (TB), a deadly disease which usually affects the lungs. Known as “white plague” or “white death,” TB was the number one cause of death in the U.S. at the dawn of the 20th century.

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3. North Dakota attorney general wants free speech lawsuit against him dismissed

Robert Drake. Special to The Forum
Robert Drake. Special to The Forum

VALLEY CITY, N.D. — North Dakota’s top attorney wants a federal judge to block a Valley City man’s effort to undo the state’s longstanding law that says residents are not guaranteed the right to speak at public meetings.

Attorney General Wayne Stenehjem filed a motion last week to dismiss the lawsuit filed against him by Robert Drake. The Valley City resident also named city commissioners in the suit, claiming leaders have refused to let him bring up issues at public meetings that are critical and potentially criminal in nature.

Read the full story here.

4. After trapping death of his favorite hunting dog, man working to change Minnesota laws

Kaycee, a yellow Labrador retriever owned by Jeff Meyer of Rochester, Minnesota, was caught in a body grip or Conibear trap in December 2012 while hunting pheasants in southern Minnesota. Kaycee survived, but 35 dogs have been killed in traps in Minnesota since 2012. Meyer was able to call a friend who traps who told him how to reposition the trap to avoid crushing the dog's windpipe. He then called 911 and a sheriff's deputy helped him remove the trap. (Photo courtesy Jeff Meyer)
Kaycee, a yellow Labrador retriever owned by Jeff Meyer of Rochester, Minnesota, was caught in a body grip or Conibear trap in December 2012 while hunting pheasants in southern Minnesota. Kaycee survived, but 35 dogs have been killed in traps in Minnesota since 2012. Meyer was able to call a friend who traps who told him how to reposition the trap to avoid crushing the dog's windpipe. He then called 911 and a sheriff's deputy helped him remove the trap. (Photo courtesy Jeff Meyer)

MERRIFIELD, Minn. -- Bobcat trapping season opens Dec. 19 in Minnesota and John Reynolds is worried about your dog.

“It happens every year. It’s going to happen this year. Someone’s dog, someone’s pet, or their favorite hunting dog, is going to die in a trap,’’ said Reynolds, of Merrifield, in central Minnesota's Crow Wing County. “And it doesn’t have to be this way.”

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5. Ice fishing shack business sees slick sales just a year into operation

VERNDALE, Minn. -- Ice fishing continues to be redefined at the Black Hole Ice Shack plant in this small central Minnesota town, where partners Jason Geis and Brian Hagen are building on the business that started just a year ago.

The business started out not long after Geis went to work creating an ice house for his father. Using his skills he'd learned at Lund Boats in New York Mills and his passion for ice fishing, he created what's now become the Black Hole Ice Shack. It's a product proving to be attractive to the modern mobile ice angler. The Black Hole is a fishing platform that acts as a flip-over fabric shelter that's secured to a solid trailer foundation capable of getting you on the fish and hauling your UTV or ATV out as well.

Read the full story here.