We see that you have javascript disabled. Please enable javascript and refresh the page to continue reading local news. If you feel you have received this message in error, please contact the customer support team at 1-833-248-7801.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Bemidji-area death investigated as a homicide

At approximately 3:25 p.m. Sunday, the Beltrami County Sheriff’s Office received a report from a male subject stating he had been shot at a residence in Turtle River Township, about 9 miles northeast of Bemidji.

police-lights-credited1.jpg
We are part of The Trust Project.

BEMIDJI, Minn. — The Sunday, Sept. 5, death of a man near Bemidji is being investigated as a homicide, according to a news release from Beltrami County Sheriff Ernie Beitel.

At approximately 3:25 p.m. Sunday, the Beltrami County Sheriff’s Office received a report from a male subject stating he had been shot at a residence in Turtle River Township, about 9 miles northeast of Bemidji.

Upon arrival, law enforcement found a deceased adult male, according to the release. The man was taken to the Midwest Medical Examiner’s Office for an autopsy and formal identification, according to the release.

According to the release, law enforcement believes this was an isolated incident and there is no threat to the public.

The Beltrami County Sheriff’s Office is being assisted on the case by the Enforcement Division of the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension and the Bemidji Police Department.

What to read next
Two mayoral, two county commissioner and three state legislature candidates debated issues at the League of Women Voters of the Red River Valley candidate forum on Tuesday, Oct. 4.
Election officials noticed the error the first day of early voting, but the county had to wait for the state Supreme Court to approve the changes.
So far in 2022, at least 17 have been killed by intimate partner violence in Minnesota.
Legislators passed a bill this spring to provide $500 million in bonus checks to workers who had to report to their jobs during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic and put themselves at greater risk than those who were able to work remotely.