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Bismarck

North Dakota had its most severe coronavirus outbreak back in November 2020, and now it's once again approaching the alarmingly high number of infections it experienced over a year ago.
Last flu season, North Dakota had a total of only 245 flu cases, according to the North Dakota Department of Health. Although the end of this flu season is still months away, the state has already seen 6,638 cases — more than 25 times the number North Dakota reported a year ago.
North Dakota had 6,062 active COVID-19 cases as of Wednesday, Jan. 12, the most the state has seen since late November 2020.
North Dakota's 14-day rolling positivity rate was 13.05% as of Monday, Jan. 10 — the highest since late November 2020.

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Last week, the number of active cases in North Dakota nearly tripled, prompting the Department of Health to reconsider how it conducts case investigations because of its limited resources.
“The data doesn’t seem to be speaking to the people anymore,” said Grace Njau, an epidemiologist with the state Department of Health. “It’s not just COVID. It’s a much bigger battle, and unfortunately I don’t know if we’re on the winning side.”
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When researchers at the Northern Great Plains Research Lab near Mandan first began researching the sustainability of North Dakota’s native grasslands in 1916, the words "climate change" would have meant little to them. But a century-old study is aiding new research to address today's problems.
The release, which was a mixture of the firefighting foam and water, originated from Williston's Polar Creek Industries U.S. facility on Thursday, Jan. 6, according to a release.
Each year, the state selects up to eight Native Americans "who have gone above and beyond in representing their tribe and culture," to be inducted into the Hall of Honor, according to the North Dakota Indian Affairs Commission.
The ticket was sold at Horizon Market, 125 Durango Drive, in Bismarck.

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The two students were arrested after they spread a Snapchat with a threat to their high school.
Patrick McKee, 77, allegedly stole another person's identity in 1997 and used their Social Security number to live under a new alias.
Katelynn Berry, the daughter of Grand Forks County Assistant State's Attorney Carmell Mattison, has been missing for two weeks, leaving her phone, wallet and winter jacket in her apartment. These abandoned belongings later found by police prompted them to start a criminal investigation into her disappearance.

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