ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Lashkowitz High Rise receives needed funding for demolition

The current building will be replaced with a 110-unit apartment complex that will feature modern amenities, larger apartment options and a parking structure. The four-story building, which will be called Lashkowitz Riverfront Apartments, will also have a rooftop patio.

051120.N.FF.HIGHRISE.jpg
The Lashkowitz High Rise located at 101 Second St. S. in Fargo is seen on Monday, May 11, 2020.
Forum file photo
We are part of The Trust Project.

FARGO — A funding shortfall for the demolition of the Lashkowitz High Rise building in Fargo has been solved thanks to incoming funding from the North Dakota Housing Finance Agency (NDHFA) earmarked for affordable housing projects throughout North Dakota.

U.S. Sen. John Hoeven, a member of the Senate Transportation, Housing and Urban Development Appropriations Committee, said the awarded funding will help the city safely remove asbestos from the high rise in order to move forward with the demolition and redevelopment.

Demolition of the Lashkowitz High Rise building is expected to cost $5.8 million.

Fargo Housing CEO Chris Brungardt said back in August that cobbling together that much money for demolition is always a big chore.

Brungardt added that Fargo Housing has raised about $4 million of the $5.8 million demolition costs from city, state, Housing and Urban Development, capital improvement and operating funds.

ADVERTISEMENT

The NDHFA is rounding out those funds with contributions of $724,000 in 9% housing credits and an additional $1.05 million in 4% housing credits.

Fargo Mayor Tim Mahoney said the additional funds will help keep the project on schedule, beginning next spring.

Affordable housing is a huge need in the Fargo metro with approximately 3,500 families on Fargo Housing’s waitlist for affordable housing, according to Brungardt in August.

100820.N.FF.DOWNTOWNDEVELOPMENTS.1
The Lashkowitz high rise.
Michael Vosburg/The Forum

The 204-foot Lashkowitz High Rise, at 101 Second St. S., overlooks the Red River, skate park, Island Park community garden and vast expanses of Fargo and Moorhead.

The building opened in 1971 and provided affordable housing along the riverfront to Fargo seniors.

The current building will be replaced with a 110-unit apartment complex that will feature modern amenities, larger apartment options and a parking structure. The four-story building, which will be called Lashkowitz Riverfront Apartments, will also have a rooftop patio.

The estimated cost of the project is $33.9 million, according to the North Dakota Industrial Commission.

The North Dakota Housing Finance Agency are funding a total of five affordable housing projects throughout the state to help meet the housing needs of low-income workers, seniors and individuals with disabilities, according to a statement from the North Dakota Industrial Commission.

ADVERTISEMENT

The statewide funding will support the development or preservation of 266 housing units in North Dakota, the statement said.

Related Topics: FARGO
Our newsroom occasionally reports stories under a byline of "staff." Often, the "staff" byline is used when rewriting basic news briefs that originate from official sources, such as a city press release about a road closure, and which require little or no reporting. At times, this byline is used when a news story includes numerous authors or when the story is formed by aggregating previously reported news from various sources. If outside sources are used, it is noted within the story.
What to read next
The new center helps homeless and at-risk youth with necessities including food, shelter and clothing as well as services to provide a path to independence for clients.
Members Only
The initiative has hit snags even before being approved. But if an independent consultant does find criminal charges are warranted against police officers, the road leads back to prosecutors who have already declined to pursue charges in the two shootings in question.
Hadiya Farrahmand said when she heard about the New York Times' photojournalism program, she decided to participate and the first thing that came to mind was to raise awareness about the current situation in Afghanistan and how Afghan women are desperate for help and support.
Police said they responded to a report of a man assaulting a woman at a home. The man died, and the woman is being treated for serious but non-life-threatening injuries.