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Prominent Fargo plastic surgeon Don Lamb dies

During his 31 years of practice, Dr. Donald Lamb traveled the world with medical mission surgical teams to help children with facial deformities.

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Dr. Don Lamb operating on a patient during a medical mission to Haiti.
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FARGO — A longtime Fargo plastic surgeon who spent much of his career caring for children with cleft lips and palates has died.

Dr. Donald Lamb passed away unexpectedly while at his lake home on Pickerel Lake, Minnesota, at age 63.

The longtime plastic surgeon started his career alongside his father's surgical practice in Fargo. The two also ran a free and well known Cleft Lip and Palate Clinic across North Dakota every year.

During his 31 years of practice, Lamb also traveled the world with medical mission surgical teams to help children with facial deformities. He went often to Peru, Ecuador and Haiti for these humanitarian missions.

Lamb's son, Dr. Patrick Lamb, joined the plastic surgery practice just this summer, becoming the third generation to do so.

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Hanson-Runsvold is in charge of arrangements.

Related Topics: FARGOPEOPLE
Kevin Wallevand has been a Reporter at WDAY-TV since 1983. He is a native of Vining, Minnesota in Otter Tail County. His series and documentary work have brought him to Africa, Vietnam, Haiti, Kosovo, South America, Mongolia, Juarez,Mexico and the Middle East. He is an multiple Emmy and national Edward R. Murrow award recipient.

Contact Email: kwallevand@wday.com
Phone Number: (701) 241-5317
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