North Dakota Senate votes to study data privacy issues

Fargo Republican Rep. Jim Kasper listens to Gregory Stites, an attorney for supporters of the new anti-corruption language in the North Dakota constitution, during a meeting at the state Capitol Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2019. John Hageman / Forum News Service
Fargo Republican Rep. Jim Kasper listens to Gregory Stites, an attorney for supporters of the new anti-corruption language in the North Dakota constitution, during a meeting at the state Capitol Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2019. John Hageman / Forum News ServiceJohn Hageman / Forum News Service

BISMARCK -- North Dakota senators agreed to study data privacy issues after national scandals grabbed headlines and prompted congressional hearings Wednesday, March 20.

The mandated legislative study included in House Bill 1485 represents a watered-down proposal from the regulations originally proposed by Fargo Republican Rep. Jim Kasper. He pushed a bill that would have allowed consumers to request companies like Google and Facebook to delete and stop collecting their personal data.

The bill was later amended into a study after industry groups cautioned lawmakers to slow down and avoid imposing the "sweeping" mandates.

The Senate passed the study bill in a 43-2 vote, more than a month after the House approved it. Under the bill, lawmakers would study the topic between the 2019 and 2021 legislative sessions.