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Woman who fought Minnesota hospital over ventilator says husband showing improvement now in Texas

According to court documents, Mercy intended to turn off her husband’s ventilator at noon on Jan. 13. Anne, who felt the hospital was not exploring other treatment options beyond the protocols, was granted a restraining order and had him transferred to a Houston hospital.

Quiner.jpg
Undated courtesy photo of Anne and Scott Quiner. Scott Quiner, 55, who has been suffering from a severe case of COVID-19 and was being kept alive by a ventilator has been moved from a Minnesota hospital to a Texas facility after a judge issued a restraining order stopping the hospital from turning off his machine. Quiner, of Buffalo, Minnesota, was a patient at Mercy Hospital in Coon Rapids. He was flown to an unnamed facility in Texas over the weekend of Jan. 15, 2022, the family's attorney said.
Contributed / Quiner family
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ST. PAUL -- The Buffalo, Minn. man, whose wife went to court to prevent an Allina Health hospital from taking him off the ventilator, is showing signs of improvement in a Houston hospital, his wife says. Scott Quiner, tested positive with COVID in late October. His wife has said he was unvaccinated.

Anne Quiner has been taking her frustrations with her husband’s care at Mercy Hospital in Coon Rapids to “the court of public opinion,” her lawyer Marjorie Holsten said to the conservative talk show host Glenn Beck on Thursday.

“What we are showing the world is that Scott was near death because of the protocols used in that hospital,” Holsten said. “But now he is recovering. He is getting better. We’re not planning a funeral. We’re planning for his release at some point.”

Anne said there has been progress, but it has been slow. His brain function appears normal, but his lungs have been damaged and scarred.

“He still is very critically ill, but they are saying they’re going to try everything they can do to save his life,” Anne said on the Stew Peter’s show on Red Voice Media. “Scott is fighting. They said he’s absolutely fighting.”

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Allina Health has declined a request for comment. In an earlier story, the healthcare system that has 12 hospitals and 90 clinics in Minnesota and Wisconsin, said it has every confidence in its medical professionals, that it cannot talk about Scott’s specific case, and that it continues “to wish the patient and family well.”

As time went on, Scott’s oxygen levels were not improving. He was put on a ventilator and transferred to the intensive care unit at Mercy Hospital on Nov. 6. He lost 30 pounds during his stay, Anne said, going from 210 lbs. to 180 lbs.

According to court documents, Mercy intended to turn off her husband’s ventilator at noon on Jan. 13. Anne, who felt the hospital was not exploring other treatment options beyond the protocols, was granted a restraining order and had him transferred to a Houston hospital. She has asked that the hospital not be named.

Mercy’s response at the time, via the Fredrikson and Byron Law firm, was that Anne’s “position is not supported by medical science or Minnesota law, and as a result, Mercy will ask the court to issue an order that Mercy has the authority to discontinue Mr. Quiner’s ventilator and proceed with his medical care plan.”

Anne spoke of her frustrations with Mercy Hospital’s staff, telling how she and a pastor were removed from the hospital chapel by security as they prayed for Scott. She said she felt the staff had abandoned Scott.

“They were telling my family that I was being very difficult, and they were pushing them to get me to either put him in comfort care or sign the DNR (Do Not Resuscitate),” she said on the Glenn Beck show.

Her experience in Texas has been very different, she told Stew Peters.

“I feel like he went from the worst doctors to the absolute best doctors in the entire United States,” she said.

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