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Father of North Dakota first lady dies

A family obituary says Maynard Helgaas, the father of First Lady Kathryn Burgum, was born in northwest Minnesota in 1934 and lived much of his life in Jamestown, N.D. Helgaas attended North Dakota State University and operated several successful agribusinesses.

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Maynard Helgaas.
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WEST FARGO — Maynard Helgaas, the father of North Dakota First Lady Kathryn Helgaas Burgum, died on Tuesday, Aug. 2, of complications from Alzheimer's Disease. He was 87.

A family obituary says Helgaas was born in northwest Minnesota in 1934 and lived much of his life in Jamestown. He attended North Dakota State University and operated several successful agribusinesses.

In 2012, Helgaas was inducted into the North Dakota Agriculture Hall of Fame for his contributions to the trade. He lived in West Fargo at the end of his life.

His obituary can be found at https://www.inforum.com/obituaries/obits/maynard-helgaas-5e83ae11f947440c4cb0b110-62e9bc975c545115648ce8ce.

Burgum, who has served as first lady since her husband, Doug, became governor in 2016, mourned her father in a tweet on Tuesday.

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"Words can hardly express my gratitude towards this incredible man, my Dad," Burgum said. "Thank you for your sacrifices, inspiration, support and love."

Jeremy Turley is a Bismarck-based reporter for Forum News Service, which provides news coverage to publications owned by Forum Communications Company.
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