ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

FirstLink reports high volume of calls since launch of new suicide and crisis lifeline

Calls to all of their resource lines have jumped up 40% since the Summer launch of 988.

09282801_SUICIDEvo4.Still001.jpg
We are part of The Trust Project.

FARGO — Since the launch of the new suicide and crisis lifeline number 988, calls have increased across the country and in the region.

All calls to the number in North Dakota and northwest Minnesota go to FirstLink in Fargo. They say call volumes across all of their lines have increased 40% since the new number was added.

People who call 9-8-8 will be in contact with someone from FirstLink to assist them depending on the situation. FirstLink is also looking for more help answering the phones for their resource lines.

More from WDAY's Sam Goetzinger
A measure to avoid a rail strike will now goes to the President, where he says he will sign it as soon as it came to his desk.

"National call volume has increased. Some centers have seen huge jumps in increase like 40% in two months. Ours has not been that significant. We have noticed an increase, but not as significant as other areas," said Ashley Ladebury Hrichena, the operations director at FirstLink.

She said it is not a bad thing call volume is increasing. It was actually expected. It is just more convenient to find help now.

ADVERTISEMENT

"If you are in crisis, or thinking about suicide, remembering a 10-digit 1-800 number is really challenging. So, there is probably a lot of people that needed help that never called because they didn't remember the number, you know, couldn't find it" she said.

What to read next
The head budget writers from last year's session are among the dozens of former legislators who will not return in 2023.
Partnership comprises 11 universities from five states, seeks to expand tech sector’s outreach in the region
The vehicle was hanging dangerously on the side of the bridge over the Sheyenne River in Valley City, police said.
North Dakota's Medicaid Fraud Unit recovers almost $1.50 for every $1 in state funds, but the team grapples with a backlog of cases.