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Minot businessman to replace school superintendent on North Dakota Higher Education Board

Gov. Doug Burgum announced Friday, June 17, that he appointed Creedence Energy Services co-founder Kevin Black to the board. Black runs a business that creates specialized chemical solutions for the oil industry, according to a news release.

Kevin Black
Kevin Black
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BISMARCK — A Minot businessman will sit on North Dakota’s Higher Education Board.

Gov. Doug Burgum announced Friday, June 17, that he appointed Creedence Energy Services co-founder and CEO Kevin Black to the board. Black runs a business that creates specialized chemical solutions for the oil industry, according to a news release.

“As a business leader, Kevin is well-suited to drive efficiency, strategy and innovation within our university system,” Burgum said.

Black replaced Jill Louters, who resigned in May to take a part-time position at the North Dakota State University Extension Service. She remains in her position as the New Rockford-Sheyenne School District superintendent.

Burgum also reappointed business consultant Danita Bye to the board. The Stanley woman was first appointed in 2020.

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The board has 10 seats, with eight voting members. It oversees 11 public colleges and universities in North Dakota.

April Baumgarten joined The Forum in February 2019 as an investigative reporter. She grew up on a ranch 10 miles southeast of Belfield, N.D., where her family raises Hereford cattle. She double majored in communications and history/political science at the University of Jamestown, N.D.
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