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North Dakota is giving out free at-home COVID-19 tests. Here's how to get one.

It is recommended that individuals pick up tests as needed, with a starting limit of two tests per household member.

Rapid At-Home COVID Test.JPG
A COVID-19 at-home test.
WDAY file photo

BISMARCK — The North Dakota Department of Health will make more than 1.5 million at-home COVID-19 test kits available statewide.

The at-home test kits, which were ordered by NDDoH with funding from the Federal Emergency Management Agency, have begun to arrive in the state.

The program is intended to supplement the ongoing federal program to distribute free tests . The test kits are being distributed statewide and will be available for pickup, at no cost, starting Tuesday, Feb. 15.

It is recommended that individuals pick up tests as needed, with a starting limit of two tests per household member.

Individuals who would like to pick up these free test kits can find a location near them via the NDDoH website at health.nd.gov/covidtesting  — located in the "test locations" table. This table will be updated twice a week as more locations receive shipments of the at-home tests.

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The following Fargo sites are included on the list:

  • COVID-19 testing storefront, 3051 25th St. S., Suite K, open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday.
  • Family HealthCare Downtown, 301 NP Ave., open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday.
  • Family HealthCare South, 4025 9th Ave. S., 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday.
  • Family HealthCare Center, 222 4th St. N., 8 a.m. to noon Monday-Friday.
  • Fargo Cass Public Health, main building, 1240 25th St. S., 7:45 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday-Friday.

Two types of tests have arrived as part of these initial orders. They include Celltrion, which is authorized for ages 14 and older, and iHealth, which is authorized for ages 2 and older.
There are no at-home tests authorized for children under age 2; children that age should be tested at a community testing location or clinic.

Individuals do not need to report their at-home test results to NDDoH, as the department cannot validate results from home testing kits.

People who need a validated result or a letter for official purposes should seek testing from a health care provider or a local public health testing site.

Related Topics: NORTH DAKOTACORONAVIRUS
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