SUBSCRIBE NOW Get a year of news PLUS a gift box!

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

North Dakota encourages parents, caretakers to apply for Family Engagement Cabinet

The Family Engagement Cabinet is a group of parents, guardians, caretakers and educators who meet every three months with Superintendent Kirsten Baesler to share opinions and ideas for ways North Dakota can improve education and community engagement.

ND Brief.jpg
We are part of The Trust Project.

BISMARCK — The North Dakota Department of Public Instruction is seeking applicants for the State Superintendent's Family Engagement Cabinet, a group of parents and caretakers of students that provides insight into how the state can improve its schools.

The Family Engagement Cabinet is a group of parents, guardians, caretakers and educators who meet every three months with Superintendent Kirsten Baesler to share opinions and ideas for ways North Dakota can improve education and community engagement.

"When parents and families are active and involved in the education of their children, both the student and the school benefit," Baesler said. "The Family Engagement Cabinet provides valuable perspectives from across the state about what’s going on in our schools, and about how they can get better."

The group currently has 18 members, but Baesler wants to expand the group to 25, according to the Department of Public Instruction. The first meeting is planned for August, and meetings are usually held at the State Capitol in Bismarck.

The deadline to submit applications is June 15 at 5 p.m. CDT. Applications and more information about the Family Engagement Cabinet can be found on the Department of Public Instruction's website.

What to read next
Michael Standaert, who most recently was employed as a correspondent based in China with the Bloomberg Industry Group, was hired by North Dakota News Cooperative to work on in-depth stories for newspapers in the state.
In 1981 Jim Hessler founded the Dickinson Police Department’s chaplaincy program, providing comfort to officers and civilians in times of tragedy. He’s been an asset to his community ever since.
The man convicted of the murder of Grand Forks police officer Cody Holte has raised a number of technical legal issues.
For more than a week, people in rural Horace have been watching water creep toward their homes, rush over and close off roads, and fill farm fields.