SUBSCRIBE NOW Get a year of news PLUS a gift box!

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

The Vault

When a person goes missing, law enforcement is often stuck in a problematic position. Without a body, it can be difficult to prove a crime existed. That means justice, however obvious it may seem, is often not achieved. For the 2001 missing persons case of Pamela Dunn, that’s not exactly the story.
As for who is responsible for the disappearances of Diede and Anderson, a listener would have to tune in and, ultimately, decide for themselves. With all 11 episodes now out, this season of the true-crime investigative podcast Dakota Spotlight is fully available to binge-listen.
As viewers rush to binge-watch 'Conversations with a Killer: The John Wayne Gacy Tapes' Netflix’s latest true crime series on John Wayne Gacy, Minnesotans are reminded that two of the Killer Clown’s victims called Minnesota home.
A family of boaters discovered the baby on Sept. 5, 2011. While they believed they were picking trash from the water, they discovered a baby wrapped inside a tote bag.

ADVERTISEMENT

Latest Headlines
All Nathan Williams is known to have had with him when he left on his trip are two fishing rods and a single shot Harrington & Richardson 12-gauge shotgun, in case he saw a grouse. He was wearing blue jeans and a black T-shirt. He didn't even have a sleeping bag — just a blue down comforter from his bed.
Special agent recounts his investigation into Michael Swango, the doctor who killed his patients
The show relies on audiotapes of Gacy himself, culled from interviews with his defense team that took place between November 1979 and April 1980, while he was awaiting trial.
This is the second time a Dallas County jury has considered the case. A trial in November ended in a mistrial after one juror refused to budge, according to notes sent to the judge from that jury.
On May 17, 1981, Karla Jo Nieland was found dead inside a vehicle belonging to her boyfriend, John Keep. Authorities arrested Keep and charged him with second- and third-degree murder — one year later, a jury found him not guilty. The case remains open.
When a gunman killed a police officer in Hope, North Dakota, in 1933, the county sheriff wasn't about to take it lying down. He persisted to track the suspect for two years over seven states and thousands of miles -- one of the most highly publicized manhunts in U.S. history.

ADVERTISEMENT

In the last scheduled episode of this season, Dakota Spotlight pulls back the curtain on the decades of pain, loss and questions suffered — often in silence — by those who knew and loved Kristin Diede and Bob Anderson, two Minnesotans gone missing in North Dakota in August 1993.
After a 1933 bank robbery in Okabena, Minnesota two theories emerged about the culprits. Initially thought to be the work of famed outlaws Bonnie and Clyde, three locals were arrested and convicted of the crime -- but one researcher is certain they didn't do it.
The Mathis case, the trial and the questions that remain to this day are the subject of a new book, "South Dakota's Mathis Murders: Horror in the Heartland" by long-time South Dakota journalist Noel Hamiel. The book is available to purchase on Monday.

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT